2-Year Study: Informal Exercise Could Play a Role in Slowing QoL, Mobility Losses Associated with PD

2-Year Study: Informal Exercise Could Play a Role in Slowing QoL, Mobility Losses Associated with PD

Plenty of research supports the idea that formal, supervised exercise interventions can slow and even improve mobility and health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) among individuals with Parkinson disease (PD), but a new study asserts that informal home-based exercise can also produce positive effects that are long-lasting, especially when individuals get in at least 2.5 hours a week—and particularly for those with more advanced stages of the disease.

The study, published in the March 28 issue of the Journal of Parkinson’s Disease, analyzed data from 3,408 individuals participating in the National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement Initiative (NPF-QII), a 3-country program that tracks functional mobility, HRQL, and lifestyle data among individuals with PD through a series of annual visits. Researchers looked at data spanning a 2-year period, hoping to see if there was any correlation between participants who reported at least 2.5 hours of exercise weekly and scores on HRQL and mobility measures over time. HQRL was measured by way of the Parkinson Disease Questionnaire; mobility was measured through the timed up-and-go test (TUG).

Full story of exercise and mobility loss in Parkinson’s Disease at APTA

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