Category: career

Neuroscientist discovers neuronal pulses in the human brain that activate after an injury

A neuroscientist’s neon pink arm cast led him and fellow researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis to discover previously undetected neuronal pulses in the human brain that activate after an immobilizing illness or injury.

The pulses appeared on MRI scans used to measure brain activity of the neuroscientist and, later, two additional adults whose arms were in casts.

The researchers compared those MRI images with scans of the scientists before and after their arms were put in casts.

The scans showed that the brain’s main circuits responsible for movement in specific areas of the body disconnected within 48 hours of a person wearing a cast that encumbered movement in such an area.

Full article at News Medical

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

HHS Discrimination Decision Runs Counter to Profession’s Values

The recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ decision to abandon protections of individuals based on gender identity isn’t just controversial — it’s in direct opposition to the official position of APTA, and inconsistent with the physical therapy profession’s Code of Ethics. The association made its stand known to HHS before the rule changes were adopted, and will continue to press for person-centered care delivered regardless of gender. 

On June 13, HHS issued its final revision to a 2016 rule that reinforced nondiscrimination policies in the Affordable Care Act. The widely criticized change was aimed at weakening the ACA’s protections against discrimination based on “race, color, national origin, sex, age, or disability” by eliminating a definition of “discrimination based on sex” that included gender identity.  

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Telemedicine helps patients with chronic pain receive support during lockdown

The covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated conditions for people living with chronic pain around the world and its long-term consequences are likely to be substantial, according to a new paper from researchers at the University of Bath’s Centre for Pain Research.

Their Topical Review, published recently in the journal PAIN, suggests that with many doctors specializing in pain being redeployed to focus on the immediate crisis, access to traditional services for patients suffering from acute conditions, such as nerve damage or arthritis, has been severely disrupted. Whilst this creates an immediate capacity challenge for healthcare professionals, it has also provided them an opportunity to move towards the greater use of ‘telemedicine’ with online consultation, say the researchers.

Chronic or persistent pain is characterized as pain that carries on for longer than 12 weeks despite medication or treatment. Whereas most people get back to normal following an injury or operation, sometimes pain carries on for longer, or comes on without any history of an injury or operation. Common examples include lower back pain, arthritis, fibromyalgia and persistent and frequent headaches. Globally the burden of chronic pain is as high as 1 in 4 of adults. Data from young people are similar.

Full article at News Medical

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

House of Delegates Takes on PT, PTA Roles; Education Transparency; Workforce Issues; More

The physical therapy profession doesn’t shy away from a challenge — and that reality was on full display at the 76th APTA House of Delegates, which set the stage for the profession’s centennial by not only taking on important professional and societal issues but doing so in an entirely new way.

In many aspects, the 2020 House resembled its predecessors in terms of the range of topics addressed, from broad concepts such as telehealth to the nuts-and-bolts of internal House operations. But there was one major difference: The entire event was conducted virtually, as most of the country continued to live under travel and in-person meeting restrictions in light of the COVID-19 pandemic

Circumstances demanded that the House quickly adapt. APTA announced its decision to suspend all in-person meetings on March 11; by early June, the association was able to offer an online House experience that allowed for nearly every facet of an in-person version. Delegates learned the technical ins and outs and stepped up to the challenge, tackling a long list of items through, as always, lively debate.

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

25 OF THE MOST WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE BEACHES IN THE WORLD

There is a broad range of wheelchair accessible beaches throughout the world, from a variety within the United States to internationally in some of the most popular vacation destinations. Finding a beautiful beach to visit is fairly easy depending on where you’d like to travel, but finding information about the accessibility can be difficult.

Many beaches offer boardwalks, ramps, and assistive equipment to help wheelchair users enjoy the sand and shore. These top 25 beaches are some of the most wheelchair accessible beaches in the world and are perfect for a vacation destination because of their wheelchair accessibility.

There are several amazing beaches along the coasts of the United States, and many of these beaches are wheelchair accessible, offering a destination that everyone can enjoy. The main accessibility features of these beaches include wider paved paths and handicap parking, while some may have accessibility equipment, ramps, and boardwalks.

Full article at Curb Free with Corey Lee

Virtual PT after knee replacement provides good outcomes with lower costs

A virtual system for in-home physical therapy (PT) provides good outcomes for patients undergoing rehabilitation following total knee arthroplasty (TKA) – with lower costs than traditional in-person PT, reports a study in the January 15, 2020 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.

“Relative to traditional home or clinic PT, virtual PT with telerehabilitation for skilled clinical oversight significantly lowered three-month health-care costs after TKA while providing similar effectiveness,” according to the clinical trial report by Janet Prvu Bettger, ScD, of Duke University, Durham, N.C., and colleagues.

Ready full article at News-Medical.net

Study finds dopamine, biological clock link to snacking, overeating and obesity

Coinciding with this increase in weight are ever-rising rates of heart disease, diabetes, cancer and health complications caused by obesity, such as hypertension. Even Alzheimer’s disease may be partly attributable to obesity and physical inactivity.

“The diet in the U.S. and other nations has changed dramatically in the last 50 years or so, with highly processed foods readily and cheaply available at any time of the day or night,” Ali Güler, a professor of biology at the University of Virginia, said. “Many of these foods are high in sugars, carbohydrates and calories, which makes for an unhealthy diet when consumed regularly over many years.”

In a study published Thursday in the journal Current Biology, Güler and his colleagues demonstrate that the pleasure center of the brain that produces the chemical dopamine, and the brain’s separate biological clock that regulates daily physiological rhythms, are linked, and that high-calorie foods — which bring pleasure — disrupt normal feeding schedules, resulting in overconsumption. Using mice as study models, the researchers mimicked the 24/7 availability of a high-fat diet, and showed that anytime snacking eventually results in obesity and related health problems.

Read full article at Science Daily

Earlier falls predict subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women

The risk of fracture in postmenopausal women can be predicted by history of falls, according to new findings from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) at the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Osteoporosis International, the study is the first to follow up on the association between history of falls and subsequent fractures.

Falls in the elderly are common, resulting in fractures and other serious health consequences. In people aged 65 years or over, falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and hospitalisation. Fall-induced injuries cause a substantial economic burden worldwide.

Conducted at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, the study comprised 8,744 women whose mean age at the beginning of the study was approximately 62 years. The study started in 1999 with an enquiry asking the study participants about their history of falls in the preceding 12 months. The researchers wanted to know how many times the study participants had fallen, what had caused the falls and how severe the falls had been; i.e., did they lead to injuries that required treatment. A follow-up enquiry was conducted in 2004, asking the study participants about any fractures they had suffered during the five-year follow-up. The self-reported fractures were confirmed from medical records.

Read full article at Eureka Alert

A key-hole procedure to treat foot and ankle disorder decreases pain, improves patient outcomes

A minimally invasive procedure to treat a common foot and ankle disorder can reduce pain, recovery time, and postsurgery complications while improving functional outcomes, according to a report published in the journal Foot and Ankle Surgery.

The procedure treats insertional Achilles tendinopathy, a common and chronic orthopedic disorder in which patients experience pain at the Achilles tendon. The chronic degenerative condition can be particularly painful for athletes who perform push-off activities, such as basketball and soccer players.

The key-hole procedure, known as percutaneous Zadek osteotomy (ZO), can significantly decrease pain and provide a patient with relief in as little as six weeks after this technique compared to 23 weeks for recovery after the traditional open surgery.

Full article at News-Medical.net

5 Reasons Why I Love Working in a Military Health System

I’m a physical therapist (PT) at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center (WRNMMC), and I love my job.

I didn’t start my career in the military health system (MHS). I worked in a civilian outpatient physical therapy clinic like a lot of physical therapists do, and then began working at WRNMMC 2 years ago. I have to say that it has been an eye-opening experience for me. What I want to do in this post is to break down the 5 reasons why I love working in the MHS. They revolve around 2 things: our patients, and the autonomy PTs have in taking care of them.

  1. The patient population: As a PT working at WRNMMC, I see a diverse group of patients. We see active duty service members, beneficiaries of service members, and retirees. The variety of patients, in turn, allows me to see a wide variety of diagnoses from poly traumas to neck and low back pain. This keeps me excited to come to work every day, because I know I’m likely to see something different. Most important, it’s incredibly rewarding to know that I can help return active duty service members to full health and duty.
  2. Working with my military counterparts: WRNMMC is my first clinical experience in the MHS, and the facility is considered the “flagship of military medicine.” I work alongside my active duty PT counterparts and military and civilian physical therapist assistants and physical therapy technicians, many with deployment and overseas experience. The level of care and compassion that the WRNMMC PT staff show daily is what makes this service run as well as it does, and it is one of my favorite things about working at WRNMMC.

Full article at APTA