Eight exercises for tennis elbow

Tennis elbow is also known as lateral epicondylitis. It occurs when a person strains the tendons in their forearm. People can usually treat tennis elbow at home with rest and over-the-counter medication. Doing specific exercises can also help ease the pain and prevent reoccurrence.

We describe eight exercises to help strengthen muscles in the forearm and prevent tennis elbow from coming back. We also cover causes and symptoms, home treatment, prevention, and when to see a doctor.

Before trying these exercises, wait for any swelling to go down. It is also a good idea to check with a doctor or a physical or occupational therapist first.

Full story at Medical News Today

Study: Popular Shoulder Procedure Provides No Relevant Clinical Benefit Over ‘Placebo Surgery’

Researchers in Finland have once again conducted a study that used “placebo surgery” to conclude that another frequently used arthroscopic procedure likely has little to no benefit: this time around, it was subacromial decompression surgery for shoulder impingement that was found to be no better than diagnostic arthroscopy alone. The procedure was also compared with physical therapy alone, but researchers are uncertain about the reliability of the results.

The study, published in BMJ, compared shoulder pain at rest and with arm activity among 122 participants, aged 35 to 65, who presented with shoulder impingement occurring for at least 3 months and unresponsive to “conventional treatment.” Participants agreed to undergo arthroscopic surgery and understood that they may be receiving either simple diagnostic arthroscopy with no other surgical procedure, or arthroscopic subacromial decompression surgery (ASD), a procedure that involves smoothing the undersurface of the acromion in hopes of easing the passage of the rotator cuff tendon through the subacromial space. Authors characterize ASD as “one of the most frequently performed orthopaedic procedures in the world.”

Full story at APTA

CMS Seeking Comments on Self-Referral Prohibitions in Stark Law

In its ongoing efforts to decrease regulatory burdens, the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has turned its attention to a law that, with the exception of physical therapy and a few other treatments and procedures, bars physicians from referring patients to services in which the physician has a financial interest. The CMS call for feedback—an effort largely focused on how the law might be loosened up—comes at a time when APTA and other organizations are voicing support for a bill that would do nearly the opposite by eliminating the exemptions allowing for self-referral for physical therapy and other services.

The CMS Request for Information (RFI) is part of an initiative dubbed the “Regulatory Sprint to Coordinated Care.” According to CMS, the focus of the initiative is on “identifying regulatory requirements or prohibitions that may act as barriers to coordinated care, assessing whether those regulatory provisions are unnecessary obstacles to coordinated care, and issuing guidance or revising regulations to address such obstacles and, as appropriate, encouraging and incentivizing coordinated care.”

Full story at APTA

FLEX CEUs: New CEU Courses

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND PAIN CONDITIONS

Pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a very common symptom.  The goals of this CEU course is to examine the occurrence of pain in MS patients, to identify the pain conditions and the relationship to important demographic variables, and to determine its impact on quality of life.  Also discussed in this course is the occurrence of central pain (CP) and its characteristics.

DANCER INJURIES AND WELLNESS

Dance participation, through its athletic nature can introduce risk of injury, but unlike sports, is not always recognized that specialist medicinal provision will assist in the mitigation of that risk.  This CEU course examines the extent of injury in dance participation and the impact that specialist dance medicine provision has on overall dance injury incidence, determines the effects of a ballet class on the levels of inflammation markers, and reviews the development and evaluation of a dancer wellness program.

Free Continuing Education for Life!

Did you know that we have a program available that gives you free continuing education for life? If this sounds like something you’re interested in, just visit https://www.flextherapistceus.com/account-refer.php to get all the details.

Possible new treatment for spinal cord injuries identified in animal studies

An experimental drug has shown promise as a potential therapy for spinal cord injuries in animal studies.

The compound, 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol, works in a similar way as a drug previously developed at Purdue, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Riyi Shi, professor in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, who was involved in the development of both drugs, compared the two compounds in both cell cultures and animal models.

“For the first time, 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol is shown to restore function in chronic spinal cord injuries,” he says. “It also reduces neuropathic pain to a greater degree than 4-AP.

Full story at Medical Xpress

What’s the truth about chiropractors?

Chiropractors attend graduate-level health colleges to treat disorders of the bones, nerves, muscles, and ligaments. They graduate as doctors of chiropractic degrees, but they are not medical doctors.

While chiropractors are widely known for treating back and neck pain, they also treat bone and soft tissue conditions.

In this article, we explore myths and truths of chiropractic care. We also describe the training that chiropractors undergo, how safe these treatments may be, and the research behind the practice.

Full story at Medical News Today

Surgical technique improves sensation, control of prosthetic limb

Humans can accurately sense the position, speed, and torque of their limbs, even with their eyes shut. This sense, known as proprioception, allows humans to precisely control their body movements.

Despite significant improvements to prosthetic devices in recent years, researchers have been unable to provide this essential sensation to people with artificial limbs, limiting their ability to accurately control their movements.

Researchers at the Center for Extreme Bionics at the MIT Media Lab have invented a new neural interface and communication paradigm that is able to send movement commands from the central nervous system to a robotic prosthesis, and relay proprioceptive feedback describing movement of the joint back to the central nervous system in return.

Full story at Medical Xpress

Home-based telehealth therapy program effective for stroke rehabilitation, shows study

In-home rehabilitation, using a telehealth system and supervised by licensed occupational/physical therapists, is an effective means of improving arm motor status in stroke survivors, according to findings presented by University of California, Irvine neurologist Steven C. Cramer, MD, at the recent 2018 European Stroke Organisation Conference in Gothenburg, Sweden.

“Motor deficits are a major contributor to post-stroke disability, and we know that occupational and physical therapy improve patient outcomes in a supervised rehabilitation program,” said Cramer, a professor of neurology in the UCI School of Medicine. “Since many patients receive suboptimal therapy doses for reasons that include cost, availability, and difficulty with travel, we wanted to determine whether a comprehensive in-home telehealth therapy program could be as effective as in-clinic rehabilitation.”

Full story at News Medical

Physical Therapy May Help Loosen Up Patients with Scleroderma

Physical therapy may be used to help alleviate some of the symptoms of scleroderma, reduce pain associated with the condition, and improve mobility, according to a news article that appears in Scleroderma News.

Physical therapy exercises could help stretch the skin, muscles, and joints affected by scleroderma. Doing so could help improve the patient’s posture, increase the range of movements that a patient can perform, as well as prevent the loss of muscle mass and strength.

Performing physical therapy could also reduce other symptoms of scleroderma, including gastrointestinal, lymph node, and nervous system problems, the news story continues.

Full story at ptproductsonline.com

How is psoriatic arthritis different from osteoarthritis?

Psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis are types of arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that happens to some people who have psoriasis. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition that occurs when the cartilage at the end of the bone wears away.

Arthritis is a term used to describe over 100 conditions that cause joint pain or joint damage. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, affecting over 30 million Americans.

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and OA share some common symptoms, but there are also some key differences between the conditions.

Full story at Medical News Today