Category: chiropractic care

CMS Coding Reversal Will Apply to Claims Made Beginning January 1, 2020

Details are still emerging around exactly how CMS intends to walk back a decision to change coding methodologies that prevented PTs from billing an evaluation performed on the same day as therapeutic activities and/or group therapy activities. But we know a little more now: namely, that the decision is retroactive to January 1 of this year, the date when the short-lived system was set in place.

APTA pressed CMS for the logistics of how its do-over would be worked out as soon as its decision was announced on January 24. On January 28, CMS informed the association that while the agency is still working on its messaging to the Medicare administrative contractors, or MACs, the reversal will be extended to claims made from January 1, 2020, on.

Full article at APTA

Judo holds promise for reducing sedentary behavior among children with autism

Judo may be just the right sport to increase the physical activity level among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and holds promise for reducing sedentary behavior, which is linked to obesity and diabetes, according to a new study from the University of Central Florida.

The pilot study found increases in moderate to vigorous physical activity among participants during and beyond the study period and a reduction of sedentary time, although researchers say the amount was not statistically significant. However, the children in the study were eager to continue judo lessons beyond the scope of the study and the few who did not continue failed to do so because of scheduling or transportation problems, rather than lack of interest. More research is needed to see if the reduction in sedentary time will last.

Full article at News-Medical.net

Woman with severe spinal cord injury recovers after treatment at Danbury Hospital

A freak accident left Katherine (Kathy) Wenning unable to move her upper body. She knew she needed medical attention, but she was at her country getaway in Washington, Connecticut -; two hours by car from her home in Manhattan and the New York medical system she trusted. Kathy put her faith in a neurosurgeon and care team at Danbury Hospital to treat her severe spinal cord injury.

Fateful fall leads to unexpected injury

Kathy, 75, was getting ready for bed when she tripped on her clothes and struck her neck on a shelf inside her closet. She lost consciousness and woke up to pain radiating from her neck down to her arms. Kathy’s husband, Michael, found her lying on the floor of the closet unable to move. She just wanted to go to sleep, hoping she would feel better in the morning.

Full story at News Medical

Traumatic brain injury patient lives to tell the tale

John Kaczmarczyk’s wife, Noelle, and their son, Dylan, were at home when they heard a thud. They went to investigate the sound and found the alarming cause. John, 58, was unconscious on the floor at the bottom of a flight of stairs with shattered glass around him.

Rapid response

Noelle and Dylan quickly assessed the situation. They suspected John fell backwards while walking up the stairs to take out the recycling. He was breathing and they didn’t see blood at first. Noelle stayed with John and Dylan went to call 911.

Everything that happened next felt like rapid fire to Noelle. Emergency medical services quickly arrived at their home and transported John to the Norwalk Hospital Bauer Emergency Care Center, where the trauma team examined him immediately.

Full story at News-Medical.net

Study: Mothers Who Exercise During Pregnancy Give Their Infants a Motor Skills Boost

The message
Infants of mothers who engaged in aerobic exercise during pregnancy tend to show better motor development at 1 month compared with infants of nonexercising mothers, according to authors of a new study. The researchers believe that aerobic exercise during pregnancy could be a hedge against childhood overweight and obesity.

The study
Researchers analyzed data from 60 healthy mothers (ages 18 to 35, with an average age of 30) and their infants. During their pregnancies, 33 women participated in 45-50 minutes of supervised aerobic exercise, 3 days a week. The remaining 27 women in the control group were asked to engage in a 50-minute supervised stretching and breathing program 3 days a week, but were otherwise advised to continue with “normal” activities. The infants of both groups were then evaluated for motor skills development at 1 month using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, second edition (PDMS-2), a tool that tests reflexes, locomotion, and a child’s ability to remain stationary. The measure also provides a composite score, known as the Gross Motor Quotient (GMQ).

Full study at APTA

Pulled muscle in chest: Symptoms and treatment

The terms pulled muscle and muscle strain refer to an injury that involves an overstretched or torn muscle. A person with a muscle strain in the chest may experience sudden, sharp pain in this area.

Although uncomfortable, a strained chest muscle is usually a minor injury that tends to heal within days or weeks.

In this article, we outline the causes of a strained chest muscle, along with possible treatments. We also explain how to differentiate the symptoms from those of other causes of chest pain.

Full story at Medical News Today

DEFINING THE SHAPE OF COOL

People are great at detecting cold temperatures and also the cool sensation induced by natural substances like menthol, which is common in remedies used to soothe aching muscles. But it hasn’t been entirely clear how we do this.

About a year ago, a group of researchers led by Seok-Yong Lee, Associate Professor of Biochemistry in the Duke University School of Medicine, figured out the architecture of the human and animal cold-sensing protein, an ion channel called TRPM8, which gave them some insight into its function but also raised more questions.

Now, Lee’s team has determined the structure TRPM8 assumes when it is bound to menthol and to another synthetic cooling agent called icilin. The findings, which will appear in Science on Feb. 8, could pave the way toward new treatments for chronic pain and migraine and help patients who suffer from extreme cold sensitivity.

Full story at Duke.edu

UTHealth enrolls first U.S. patient in novel stem cell trial to treat stroke disability

The first U.S. patient to participate in a global study of a stem cell therapy injected directly into the brain to treat stroke disability was enrolled in the clinical trial this week at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth).

“At McGovern Medical School at UTHealth, we have been studying cellular therapies as a novel treatment for stroke over the past 10 years. We are very excited to partner with ReNeuron and enroll the first patient into the PISCES III study,” said Sean I. Savitz, MD, the study’s global principal investigator and professor and director of the Institute for Stroke and Cerebrovascular Disease at UTHealth. “This study represents an important next step in the development of novel cellular therapies for chronic stroke and, to date, is the most advanced clinical trial to determine whether neural stem cells improve recovery in patients chronically disabled by stroke.”

Full story at news-medical.net

Draft HHS Report Backs Nonpharmacological Pain Management, Calls for Better Payer Coverage of Physical Therapy

Much like an APTA white paper on opioids and pain management published in the summer of 2018, a draft report from the US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) says that it’s time to address the gaps in the health care system that make it difficult to follow best practices in addressing pain—including improved access to and payment for physical therapy. APTA provided comments to the HHS task force that created the report.

The draft “Report on Pain Management Best Practices” now available for public comment aims to identify “gaps, inconsistencies, updates, and recommendations for acute and chronic pain management best practices” across 5 major interdisciplinary treatment modalities: medication, restorative therapies including physical therapy, interventional procedures, behavioral health approaches, and complementary and integrative health. The entire report is predicated on a set of “key concepts” that emphasize an individualized biopsychosocial model of care that employs a multidisciplinary approach and stresses the need for innovation and research.

Full story at APTA

Can exercise lower blood pressure as effectively as drugs?

Millions of people live with high blood pressure, which can place them at risk of developing cardiovascular diseases. For this condition, doctors typically prescribe blood-lowering drugs, but could exercise help just as well?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 75 millionadults in the United States have to manage high blood pressure, where it exceeds the threshold of 140 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg).

The condition can increase their risk of developing heart disease or experiencing a stroke, both of which are leading causes of death in the U.S.

Full story at Medical News Today