Category: chiropractic care

Is EMS Training the Missing Link to Your Dream Body?

THE THING ABOUT building muscle, cutting fat and otherwise getting in shape is, well, you have to work out. No fair, right? But what if someone – or something – else could do a lot of the work for you? Such is the commonly perceived promise of electrical muscle stimulation training, aka EMS, a type of technology that activates your muscles from the outside while you activate them from the inside.

“It’s an efficient workout,” says Jackie Wilson, a lawyer-turned-personal trainer who founded NOVA Fitness Innovation, a network of boutique fitness studios in New York City that offers one-on-one EMS training sessions.

While the specifics vary depending on the model of equipment itself and the type of supervision you’re under, in Wilson’s studios, the training involves wearing a wetsuit-like outfit embedded with 20 electrodes that sit atop major muscle groups like the pecs, biceps and quads. As clients go through a body weight or lightly weighted workout – say, a circuit including squats, pushups and jumping jacks – he or another trained staff member uses a wireless device to send impulses of varying intensities to those muscles that are contracting.

Full story at US News

Early physical therapy associated with reduction in opioid use

Patients who underwent physical therapy soon after being diagnosed with pain in the shoulder, neck, low back or knee were approximately 7 to 16 percent less likely to use opioids in the subsequent months, according to a new study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Duke University School of Medicine.

For patients with shoulder, back or knee pain who did use opioids, early physical therapy was associated with a 5 to 10 percent reduction in how much of the drug they used, the study found.

Amid national concern about the overuse of opioids and encouragement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other groups to deploy alternatives when possible, the findings provide evidence that physical therapy can be a useful, nonpharmacologic approach for managing severe musculoskeletal pain.

Full story at news-medical.net

Cochrane Researchers ‘Confident’ in Pelvic Floor Muscle Therapy as Effective UI Treatment

Pelvic floor muscle therapy (PFMT) “could be included in first‐line conservative management programs” for women with urinary incontinence (UI), according to the authors of a recently updated Cochrane systematic review. While the conclusion itself isn’t new, the revision includes more evidence that makes the case for PFMT even stronger.

Authors analyzed data from 31 trials including a total of 1,817 women. The studies examined whether women were “cured” or “cured or improved” as a result of treatment for stress urinary incontinence (SUI), urgency urinary incontinence (UUI), or mixed urinary incontinence (MUI). Researchers also looked at the effects of PFMT on quality of life.

The results were clear, according to authors: women with all types of UI experienced greater benefit from PFMT than from no treatment or control interventions, which included sham electrical stimulation, placebo drug, or other inactive treatments such as educational pamphlets.

Full story at APTA

Study: Clinic Ball Pits Carry Bacterial Risks

It’s no secret that when it comes to their potential for bacterial awfulness, the children’s ball pits often found in fast food restaurants are the stuff of a germaphobe’s nightmares. Now it turns out that if not properly maintained, ball pits in physical therapy clinics are capable of inducing shudders too.

In a study recently published in the American Journal of Infection Control, researchers tested 6 ball pits in inpatient and outpatient physical therapy clinics in Georgia to find out what, if anything, those pits were harboring at a microbial level. Authors hope that the study will help to spark a conversation about standards for cleaning the enclosures—standards that they say have remained “elusive” to date.

To conduct the analysis, researchers collected 9 to 15 balls taken from different depths in each ball pit, and then swabbed the entire surface of each ball. Samples were then inoculated on agar plates and allowed to grow for 24 hours at 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit. After the incubation, samples were tested for the number of colony-forming units (CFUS) present. Here’s what researchers found:

Full story at APTA

CSM Delivers: Aging

As the US population continues to age, physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) will take on an even more transformative role in the health of society. Are you ready?

The 2019 APTA Combined Sections Meeting, set for January 23-26 in downtown Washington, DC, can help keep you on top of some of the latest issues in healthy aging. Check out these suggestions, and find other relevant programming by searching the CSM programming page.

Geriatric Low Back Pain: Managing Influences, Experiences, and Consequences
This session focuses on the biological, psychological, cognitive, and social influences of geriatric low back pain (LBP), and presents a comprehensive model of geriatric LBP that accounts for the interface between pain and impaired movement, as well mobility and health risks associated with geriatric LBP. Find out about age-appropriate measurement tools and interventions for geriatric LBP and learn how to implement a comprehensive, standardized management approach that optimizes recovery and mitigates health risks associated with geriatric LBP. Friday, January 25, 8:00 am–10:00 am.

Full story at APTA

UA scientist hopes to heal bone fractures using combination of 3D printing and adult stem cells

Not all broken bones heal. But one scientist at the University of Arizona hopes to remedy that problem using a combination of 3D printing and adult stem cells.

“Imagine an impact that causes half of a long bone to shatter so that it can’t be put back together – no current surgical treatment can ensure that kind of injury will heal,” explained John A. Szivek, PhD, a scientist at the UA College of Medicine – Tucson. “This is a really big problem for the military, where explosions or combat injuries can cause big bone defects.”

To help military personnel with these devastating injuries, Dr. Szivek, a biomedical engineer and professor of orthopedic surgery, has received a five-year, $2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense to launch a study to determine how to heal bone fractures using a combination of 3D printing and adult stem cells.

Full story at news-medical.net

8 stretches for the middle back

Mid back pain or stiffness can have a significant impact on daily life. However, certain stretches can help relieve pain and improve flexibility.

Back pain, especially short-term pain, is one of the most common medical complaints in the United States. A variety of lifestyle factors, medical conditions, and injuries can lead to pain in the middle back.

Symptoms of mid back pain can include:

  • short, sharp pains
  • a dull, constant ache
  • muscle tightness or stiffness
  • a reduced range of motion\

Full story at Medical News Today

What’s New at PTNow? More Guidelines and Systematic Reviews Enrich an Already-Robust Resource

The range of conditions that physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) face every day can be expansive, and staying on top of the latest effective treatment approaches can seem like an impossible task. PTNow is helping to change all that by bringing members the evidence they need in just a few clicks.

Best of all, the association’s flagship site for evidence-based practice resources continues to expand in ways that help PTs and PTAs easily find an even wider array of information. If you haven’t visited the site lately, check it out soon. Here’s a quick take on the latest additions.

Full story at APTA

Working through pain to get rid of pain: A physical therapist’s perspective

In my job as a physical therapist, the impact of the opioid epidemic is impossible to ignore. A large percentage of my patients are dealing with some degree of pain. For some, it is the result of a surgery, for others, a sports injury, and some have been living in chronic pain for over a decade. I understand why patients are prescribed opioids, and I don’t discount them as a valuable tool in treating acute pain. However, I believe it’s important to match the pharmaceutical intervention to the severity of the condition and provide a treatment plan that ultimately works toward little or no pharmacology whenever possible.

A recent study from Penn Medicine examined emergency room visits in the U.S. for ankle sprains — one of the most common injuries in sports for which the acute treatment is rest, ice, compression and elevation. An anti-inflammatory, such as ibuprofen, helps to reduce swelling and usually provides adequate pain relief. The researchers found on average 25 percent of these patients were prescribed an opioid in the ER. This is an example of a mismatch between injury and medical prescription. An ankle sprain will rarely necessitate an opioid prescription, and this study highlighted the over prescribing practices taking place across the nation — in some states more than others.

Full story at Orlando Sentinel

Paralysis breakthrough: Electrical implant helps man walk again

A recent case study could overturn existing beliefs about certain paralysis types. An approach combining spinal cord stimulation and physical therapy has now helped a man living for years with lower-body paralysis to stand and walk.

Paraplegia is a condition wherein an individual’s lower body is paralyzed.

A 29-year-old man left with the condition after a snowmobile accident in 2013 has recently been able to stand and walk with some assistance.

This is all thanks to an electrical implant that can stimulate nerves in the spinal cord.

Full story at Medical News Today