CPG: Avoid Surgery for Atraumatic Shoulder Pain

Authors of a new clinical practice guideline (CPG) on treatment of shoulder pain took a hard look at the advisability of surgery and came to a conclusion that can be boiled down to 3 words: don’t do it.

Published in BMJ, the CPG focuses on adults with a traumatic shoulder pain lasting for 3 months or more (diagnosed as subacromial pain syndrome, or SAPS), and zeroes in on the effectiveness of arthroscopic decompression surgery versus nonsurgical approaches including exercise therapy, analgesics, and injections. The CPG development group, which included patients who had experienced SAPS, analyzed results of 2 systematic reviews—one on what constitutes a “minimally critically important difference” (MCID) in patient-reported outcomes, and another on the benefits and harms of decompression surgery. The systematic reviews included 7 trials involving 1, 014 patients.

In reviewing the systematic review of MCIDs for SAPS, the CPG group identified, with confidence, 2 changes that patients value: a difference in pain of at least 1.5 points on a visual 1-10 scale, and a difference in function of at least 8.3 units on a 100-point scale. In both areas, decompression surgery resulted in no significant differences from other approaches—including placebo surgery. The lack of difference remained at 6-month, 2-year, and 5-year follow ups.

Full story at APTA