New nonsurgical treatment reduces pain, improves function in patients with “frozen shoulder”

New nonsurgical treatment reduces pain, improves function in patients with “frozen shoulder”

A new nonsurgical treatment decreases errant blood flow in the shoulder to quickly reduce pain and improve function in patients with adhesive capsulitis, also known as “frozen shoulder.”

According to a research abstract presented during a virtual session of the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 2020 Annual Scientific Meeting on June 13.

Frozen shoulder gradually causes significant pain and stiffness of the shoulder joint in an estimated 200,000 people in the U.S. each year. The symptoms are often treated with physical therapy or pain medications, until they resolve within one to three years.

“Patients with frozen shoulder are essentially told to tough it out until their symptoms improve, but considering the significant pain and decreased function many experience, we looked to determine if this treatment model of embolization, already in use in other areas of the body, could provide immediate and durable relief,” said Sandeep Bagla, MD, CEO of Vascular Interventional Partners, NOVA and lead author of the study.

Full article at News Medical

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