What’s Muscle Tone, Anyway?

What’s Muscle Tone, Anyway?

Professional Physical Therapy and Nutley Midtown Clinical Director Nicholas Licameli are featured on KAleishaFetters.com in an article titled, “What’s Muscle Tone, Anyway?”

In the article, Nicholas talks about the way to talk about muscles and stretching. “Some buzz terms you may have heard when it comes to stretching and foam rolling are muscle lengthening, breaking down scar tissue, freeing up adhesions, or remodeling of collagen,” he says. “However, research does not support these claims.” That doesn’t mean stretching and foam rolling aren’t good for your – Nicholas also discusses the benefits of these actions.

Full article at Professional PT

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Alert: Suspect ‘Checks’ Are Making the Rounds

Did you recently receive what appears to be a check for payment of services from a national proprietary provider network? Be careful: It may not be what you think.

APTA has been made aware that some PTs are receiving what looks like a check but is in fact an agreement to participate in a provider network. The fine print that accompanies the check makes it clear: Endorsing and cashing or depositing this check constitutes acceptance of network participation, and acceptance and agreement of all terms and conditions of the agreement. APTA is sharing this information with you as a reminder of the importance of thoroughly reading all information from a payer or third-party administrator, or TPA.

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Music appears to decrease delirium in critically ill patients

It is common for critically ill patients on life support to develop delirium, a form of acute brain failure for which no effective treatment is known. A study from Indiana University School of Medicine and Regenstrief Institute researchers reports that music appears to decrease delirium in patients on mechanical ventilators in the intensive care unit (ICU).

In the study, critically ill individuals who listened to slow-tempo, relaxing music (60 to 80 beats per minute) had decreased need for sedatives, fewer days of delirium and were more awake — enabling them to receive physical therapy earlier. These results are encouraging and a larger clinical trial is currently underway.

Mechanically ventilated patients — more than a million adults annually in the United States — are at increased risk for delirium, which is associated with prolonged ICU stays, higher healthcare costs and increased mortality. The intubated patient experiences pain, anxiety and physiologic stress for which they usually are treated with drugs, which can contribute to delirium. This perpetuates a cycle of pain, anxiety, sedation and delirium.

Full article at News Medical

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Advisory: PTs, Telehealth, and the Coronavirus

As the coronavirus continues to spread globally, members are asking about the possibility of reducing infection risk by conducting PT services through telehealth. There are important factors to consider, particularly related to telehealth services to Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.

Remember: Physical therapists are not statutorily authorized Medicare providers of telehealth, and physical therapy services delivered via telehealth are not payable under the physician fee schedule. Before you consider furnishing telehealth services to Medicare beneficiaries and collecting out of pocket payment, contact your Medicare Administrative Contractor or CMS regional office to ask for an opinion.

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

TRICARE Balks at Covering TENS and Dry Needling

The TRICARE Health program used throughout the U.S. Department of Defense health care system has disallowed transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation — TENS — as a reimbursable treatment for low back pain. And in another recent shift, the DoD agency that oversees TRICARE has decided that dry needling will not be covered if it’s the sole purpose for a visit.

The TENS decision was announced by the Defense Health Agency on February 26 and is effective June 1, 2020. In the notice of the change, the DoD says the TRICARE policy manual will now list TENS as an “unproven” treatment for low back pain and thus not eligible for coverage. Until now, TRICARE contractors were allowed to decide whether TENS was medically necessary for treatment of LBP.

According to a recent article in Military.com, DoD arrived at its decision after reviewing multiple studies that found weak evidence for the effectiveness of TENS for LBP, with a TRICARE official telling the site that the findings indicated that “TENS for lower back pain is no more effective than … placebo.”

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Newly developed mobile app helps reduce pain in osteoarthritis patients

By performing a few simple physical exercises daily, and receiving information about their disease regularly, 500 osteoarthritis patients were able to on average halve their pain in 6 months – and improve their physical function. The participants in the study from Lund University in Sweden used a newly developed mobile app to help them keep track.

“We expected patients to see an improvement, but these results exceeded our expectations. This demonstrates that using digital tools when treating chronic illnesses such as osteoarthritis can work very well”, says researcher and physiotherapist Håkan Nero at Lund University.

The study is published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE, and is somewhat unique in that the researchers followed the patients over a longer time period, in some cases for up to a year.

Full article at News Medical

Continuing Education for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

What to know about scapular winging

Scapular winging involves one or both shoulder blades sticking out from the back rather than lying flat. It can happen as a result of injury or nerve damage.

The scapula, or shoulder blades, are flat bones that connect the upper arm to the collar bone. When they come out of place, it can cause scapular winging.

Scapular winging is a rare condition that can be painful.

This article will discuss the possible causes of scapular winging, as well as symptoms and treatment methods.

Full article at Medical News Today

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Coronavirus Reports: What We Know, and What We Don’t

Every day there are new developments in the spread of coronavirus — also known as COVID-19 — but there are also debates among experts on how the disease is spread and its impact on people who become infected. While overall risk of catching the disease is low, health care professionals are at higher risk. APTA reminds PTs and PTAs to follow precautions for reducing the spread of infectious diseases — an important aspect of health care to be mindful of at all times, not just during periods of high risk.

Since the disease first appeared in Wuhan, China, in December 2019, it has affected over 92,000 people in more than 70 countries on every continent. As of the afternoon of March 3, the Johns Hopkins University coronavirus tracker registered 108 COVID-19 cases in the United States, including six deaths.

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

CMS Resolves Compact Snag, Says Privilege Satisfies Requirements

It’s settled: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has stated definitively that PTs and PTAs with physical therapy compact privileges are considered valid license-holders for purposes of meeting federal licensure requirements around Medicare. The CMS verification ends several months of uncertainty about the reach of the system that allows PTs and PTAs licensed in one compact state to obtain practice privileges in other compact states.

APTA, the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy, and the Compact Commission that oversees the program have pressed CMS for clarification ever since privilege holders began reporting problems with enrolling in Medicare to serve residents of states included in the compact in late 2019. In a February 25 email following up on a meeting held two weeks earlier, CMS wrote that “further discussions with our general counsel have determined that the compact license is considered a valid, full licensure for purposes of meeting licensure requirements.”

Full article at APTA

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists

Virtual Reality film on refugee crisis premiers at Thessaloniki Documentary Festival in March 2020

Following international production, not-for-profit production company Reality Learning and World Federation of Occupational Therapists (WFOT) are proud to premier its immersive virtual reality (VR) experience on Athens’ refugee crisis at Thessaloniki Documentary Festival in Greece this March.

The eight minute documentary, Night Becomes Day, was shot in urban Athens and refugee camp to provide an impressionistic experience of what it means to seek safety in Greece and rebuild meaningful lives with the support of the local community.

Production Company Founder and Film Producer, Judith Hewitson, said that when it comes to better understanding the experience of refugee communities it’s the human stories that most need to be told.

Full article at WFOT

CEUs for Physical Therapists, Physical Therapist Assistants, and Occupational Therapists