Study: Clinic Ball Pits Carry Bacterial Risks

It’s no secret that when it comes to their potential for bacterial awfulness, the children’s ball pits often found in fast food restaurants are the stuff of a germaphobe’s nightmares. Now it turns out that if not properly maintained, ball pits in physical therapy clinics are capable of inducing shudders too.

In a study recently published in the American Journal of Infection Control, researchers tested 6 ball pits in inpatient and outpatient physical therapy clinics in Georgia to find out what, if anything, those pits were harboring at a microbial level. Authors hope that the study will help to spark a conversation about standards for cleaning the enclosures—standards that they say have remained “elusive” to date.

To conduct the analysis, researchers collected 9 to 15 balls taken from different depths in each ball pit, and then swabbed the entire surface of each ball. Samples were then inoculated on agar plates and allowed to grow for 24 hours at 91.4 degrees Fahrenheit. After the incubation, samples were tested for the number of colony-forming units (CFUS) present. Here’s what researchers found:

Full story at APTA