SYMPTOMS POP UP EARLIER FOR KIDS OF PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA

Family history, variations in certain genes, and medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes influence a person’s chance of developing dementia. But less clear are the factors that affect when the first symptoms of forgetfulness and confusion will arise.

Factors such as education, blood pressure, and carrying the genetic variant APOE4, which increases the risk of dementia, accounted for less than a third of the variation in the age at onset—meaning that more than two-thirds remains to be explained.

“It’s important to know who is going to get dementia, but it’s also important to know when symptoms will develop,” says first author Gregory Day, an assistant professor of neurology and an investigator at the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Full story at Futurity