Systematic Review: Commercial Video Games Likely a Good Option for Rehab

While researchers and designers continue to work on advanced video games and hardware intended specifically for rehabilitation, a new systematic review says that there’s sufficient research to support the idea that off-the-shelf games available on commercial gaming systems are useful as an adjunct to more traditional rehab approaches.

Researchers writing in the International Journal of Rehabilitation Research described findings from their analysis of 126 research articles published between 2008 and 2015, all of which focused on the use of commercially available gaming systems (VGs)—Nintendo Wii, Sony PlayStation, and Microsoft Xbox—as a component of rehabilitation. A total of 4,240 patients were included in the studies, which looked at VG use in connection with stroke recovery, cerebral palsy (CP), Parkinson disease (PD), balance training, problems associated with aging, and weight control.

Full story of commercial video games an option for rehab at APTA

Self-Reported Quality of Life Among Adolescents With Cerebral Palsy Similar to Peers Without Disability

In what authors describe as “some of the most reliable evidence on how adolescents with cerebral palsy feel about life,” a new study from Europe reports that in general, self-reported quality of life (QoL) among this population isn’t that much different from their peers without disability, but could be even better with greater attention paid to pain early on.

Researchers gathered responses to a survey (KIDSCREEN) issued to the same group of 355 individuals with cerebral palsy at 2 different points in their lives—as children aged 8 to 12 (average respondent age 10.4) and then later as adolescents aged 13 to 17 (average respondent age 15.1). The study compared the responses against results from adolescents without a disability and longitudinally within the respondents with cerebral palsy. An article describing the results was e-published ahead of print in the October 7 issue of The Lancet.

Full story of life with cerebral palsy among adolescents at APTA

CIMT Can Be Effective for Children with Cerebral Palsy

A newly published meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) supports the use of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for children with cerebral palsy as an effective intervention for upper-limb function, albeit one whose effectiveness isn’t necessarily a slam dunk over other dose-equivalent approaches.

The study, e-published ahead of print in Clinical Rehabilitation looked at 27 RCTs between 2004 and 2014 that included 894 participants with cerebral palsy ranging in age from 2.4 to 10.7 years. The majority of studies focused on a 5 day per-week intervention over the course of 2 to 3 weeks, and restraints included slings, gloves, mittens, and casts.

Full story of CIMT for children with cerebral palsy at APTA