Study: Physical Activity and Higher Motor Skills Create a ‘Cognitive Reserve’ Even When Brain Pathologies Are Present

New research combining postmortem examination of brain tissue with testing during life has revealed what researchers believe to be an as-yet unexplained connection: higher levels of physical activity (PA) and motor skills seem to create a “cognitive reserve” that buoys cognitive performance during life, even in the presence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Lewy body disease, and other brain pathologies associated with dementia.

For the study, published ahead of print in Neurology, researchers examined brain tissue from 454 participants involved in the Rush Memory and Aging Project (MAP). The subjects participated in a battery of annual clinical assessments and agreed to brain donation at the time of death. The clinical tests included 21 cognitive assessments, an analysis of 10 motor abilities, and an estimation of total daily PA drawn from accelerometers worn constantly for 10 days (researchers in this study used only the first 7 days’ data).

Full story at APTA