JAMA Oncology: Telerehab Makes a Difference in Patients With Advanced-Stage Cancer

“Collaborative telerehabilitation” isn’t a regular part of care for patients with advanced-stage cancer, but maybe it should be, say authors of a study recently published in JAMA Oncology.They found that the approach, which combines remotely delivered rehabilitation instruction with outpatient physical therapy and regular communication, can reduce pain, improve function, shorten hospital says, and decrease the use of postacute care facilities.

The findings are based on results from the Collaborative Care to Preserve Performance in Cancer (COPE) program, a randomized clinical trial designed to address what the JAMA authors describe as a “knowledge gap” in the application of collaborative care models (CCMs) focused on patient function. The COPE trial includes patients with stage III or IV solid or hematologic cancer with a life expectancy of more than 6 months, and who reported moderate functional impairment (a score of 53-60 on the Activity Measure for Postacute Care assessment, or AM-PAC).

Full story at APTA