Study: Light Physical Activity Could Help to Lower Risk of Coronary and Cardiovascular Problems

No one doubts the positive health effects of regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), but now researchers are finding that even light physical activity can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and cardiovascular disease. The latest findings, focused on women age 65 and older, echo revised US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) activity guidelines strongly supported by APTA.

The recent study, published in JAMA Network Open, asked 5,861 women with an average age of 78.5 years to wear a hip accelerometer for a week to establish PA rates, and then tracked rates of later coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) for nearly 5 years. Researchers were particularly interested in the effect of light physical activity (PA)—between 1.6 and 2.9 metabolic equivalent tasks (METs)—on the risk of experiencing CVD and CHD.

Researchers divided the participants into 4 groups based on the average amount of time spent per day in light PA: 36-236 minutes, 235-285 minutes, 286-333 minutes, and 334-617 minutes. They also tracked rates of MVPA, as well as demographic, educational, and health information including the presence of chronic conditions, alcohol consumption, smoker or nonsmoker status, and use of antihypertensive and antilipidemic medications. The population studied was a mix of white (48%), black (33.5%), and Hispanic (17.6%) women.

Full story at APTA

Physical Activity May Decrease Mortality Risk in Frail Older Adults, Say Researchers

While previous research has found that physical exercise decreases fall risk and improves mobility, researchers at the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) in Spain wondered whether physical activity could reduce frailty-associated mortality risk. In their study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, authors found that physical activity decreased mortality rates for healthy, prefrail, and frail adults over age 60.

Authors used data from a nationally representative sample of 3,896 community-dwelling individuals to explore any “separate and joint associations between physical activity and frailty” and all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rates.

At baseline, in 2000–2001, researchers interviewed participants at home about their “leisure-time” physical activity: inactive, occasional, several times a month, or several times a week. They administered both the Fatigue, Resistance, Ambulation, Illness, and weight Loss (FRAIL) scale and 3 items from the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) to measure frailty, fatigue, resistance, ambulation, and weight loss. Participants also were asked whether they had been diagnosed with pneumonia, asthma or chronic bronchitis, hypertension, coronary heart disease, stroke, osteoarthritis or rheumatism, diabetes mellitus, depression under drug treatment, hip fracture, Parkinson disease, or cancer.

Full story at APTA

Under 2 hours of walking per week may considerably prolong life

A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine suggests that even a little walking can significantly reduce mortality risk, compared with inactivity.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans recommend that adults engage in at least 150 minutes of moderate physical activity, or 75 minutes of intense physical activity, each week to reap “substantial” health benefits.

Some of these benefits include a reduced risk of premature death, cardiovascular diseases such as coronary heart disease and stroke, cancer, type 2 diabetes, and osteoporosis.

Full story at Medical News Today

CDC: 1 in 4 Americans Have Multiple Chronic Conditions, With Wide Variation Among States

According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) one-quarter of the US adult population has multiple chronic conditions (MCCs), but that average doesn’t reflect regional differences, which include state MCC rates as low as 1 in 5 residents to a high of more than 1 in 3.

The report, based on results of a 2014 National Health Interview Survey of 36,697 results, tracks the prevalence of adults who reported having 2 or more of 10 chronic conditions: arthritis, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease, diabetes, hepatitis, hypertension, stroke, or weak or failing kidneys. Respondents included Medicare beneficiaries and the privately insured.

Full story of Americans with multiple chronic conditions at APTA