Study Reveals Racial Disparities in Postdischarge Rehab After Traumatic Injury

The road to recovery after a moderate-to-severe traumatic injury can be daunting for anyone, but a new study suggests that individuals who are African American may face an even more challenging path. Researchers found that in groups matched for age, injury type, and injury severity, African Americans were on average 36% less likely to use rehabilitation services and 40% less likely to have outpatient visits postdischarge.

The presence of the apparent difference echoes APTA’s characterization of racial and ethnic disparities as existing “across a range of illnesses and health care services.”

The study’s conclusions are based on an analysis of 2.5 years’ worth of patient-reported data linked to trauma treatment records from 3 Boston-area level 1 trauma centers participating in the Functional Outcomes and Recovery after Trauma (FORTE) project. Patients included in the study experienced moderate-to-severe trauma, defined as an Injury Severity Score (ISS) of 9 or greater, and participated in phone interviews conducted 6 to 12 months after trauma center discharge. Results were published in the American Journal of Surgery.

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