Tag: health

Earlier falls predict subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women

The risk of fracture in postmenopausal women can be predicted by history of falls, according to new findings from the Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Prevention Study (OSTPRE) at the University of Eastern Finland. Published in Osteoporosis International, the study is the first to follow up on the association between history of falls and subsequent fractures.

Falls in the elderly are common, resulting in fractures and other serious health consequences. In people aged 65 years or over, falls are the leading cause of injury-related death and hospitalisation. Fall-induced injuries cause a substantial economic burden worldwide.

Conducted at the University of Eastern Finland and Kuopio University Hospital, the study comprised 8,744 women whose mean age at the beginning of the study was approximately 62 years. The study started in 1999 with an enquiry asking the study participants about their history of falls in the preceding 12 months. The researchers wanted to know how many times the study participants had fallen, what had caused the falls and how severe the falls had been; i.e., did they lead to injuries that required treatment. A follow-up enquiry was conducted in 2004, asking the study participants about any fractures they had suffered during the five-year follow-up. The self-reported fractures were confirmed from medical records.

Read full article at Eureka Alert

11 Ways Physical Therapists Help Slow the Progression of Parkinson’s Disease

It is well-known that exercise of any kind is good for each person’s health, both body and mind. But did you know that it is even more important for those living with Parkinson’s disease? Physical therapy is key to slowing down the disease. And it helps those affected to stay as independent as possible.

Improving mobility, strength, and balance

Staying mobile and self-sufficient is top of mind for people living with Parkinson’s disease. Stiffness is also a known problem with the disease. This rigidity can cause poor posture and pain that leads to other functional problems. A physical therapist can help with these problems. PTs guide people with Parkinson’s through moves and stretches to increase mobility, strength, and balance.

Full story at Choose PT

Magnetic nano-sized disks could restore function for Lou Gehrig’s disease patients

For decades the renowned English physicist Stephen Hawking lived with a motor neuron disease until his death last year. People who suffer from this condition lose functionality of brain cells that control essential muscle activity, such as speaking, walking, breathing and swallowing.

To help individuals afflicted by MNDs, UTSA has embarked on revolutionary research that uses magnetic nano-sized disks and magnetic fields to individually modulate functionality to crucial neurons. This research could open the door to reversal of degenerative conditions like Hawking’s to restore the quality of life for about 1 million adults across the globe.

Full story at Medical-News

New Research: Prescriptions for Narcotics Are Surging for Knee Pain

Although physical therapy and lifestyle changes have been shown to bring significant improvements to those with knee osteoarthritis, new research suggests U.S. physicians may be leaning toward pain medications instead.

Published in Arthritis Care & Research, the study looks at 2,297 physician visits for the condition, data that’s kept in a national database. Researchers found that PT and lifestyle suggestions—like losing weight, quitting smoking, eating healthier foods, and getting more exercise—declined from 2007 to 2015, while prescriptions for nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, narcotics, and opioids increased.

In fact, during study period, lifestyle recommendations and referrals for physical therapists were reduced nearly by half, while prescriptions for narcotic pain relievers nearly tripled.

Full story at Runner’s World

Osteoarthritis May Play a Role in Social Isolation

When older adults become socially isolated, their health and well-being can suffer. Now a new study suggests a link between being socially isolated and osteoarthritis (arthritis), a condition that causes joint pain and can limit a person’s ability to get around.

The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

Arthritis patients often have other health issues which may increase their risk of becoming socially isolated. These include anxiety and depression, being afraid to move around (because arthritis makes moving painful), physical inactivity and being unable to take care of themselves.

Full story at Psych Central

Technology’s Brave New World of Ethical Challenges Explored in PT in Motion Magazine

That latest piece of technology you’re thinking about weaving into your practice? Maybe it should come with a warning label.

This month, PT in Motion magazine takes a look at the ethical issues that new technologies can introduce in physical therapist practice. From seemingly offhand social media posts to the use of voice assistant devices (VADs) such as Alexa to mounting cameras in clinics, experts interviewed for the story explain the ethical considerations that need to be weighed before powering up.

“New Technology: Keeping It Ethical, Keeping It Legal” focuses on 7 general areas of technology: providing online advice, posting photos, VADs, wearable technology, use of cameras, electronic health records, and telehealth. PTs interviewed for the article include APTA Ethics and Judicial Committee Chair Bruce Greenfield, PT PhD, FAPTA; APTA Section of Health Policy and Administration member Robert Latz, PT, DPT, who’s also the section’s representative on the association’s Frontiers in Rehabilitation, Science, and Technology Council; and Nancy Kirsch, PT, DPT, PhD, FAPTA, president of the Federation of State Boards of Physical Therapy and author of PT in Motion‘s “Ethics in Practice” column.

Full story at APTA

Traumatic brain injury patient lives to tell the tale

John Kaczmarczyk’s wife, Noelle, and their son, Dylan, were at home when they heard a thud. They went to investigate the sound and found the alarming cause. John, 58, was unconscious on the floor at the bottom of a flight of stairs with shattered glass around him.

Rapid response

Noelle and Dylan quickly assessed the situation. They suspected John fell backwards while walking up the stairs to take out the recycling. He was breathing and they didn’t see blood at first. Noelle stayed with John and Dylan went to call 911.

Everything that happened next felt like rapid fire to Noelle. Emergency medical services quickly arrived at their home and transported John to the Norwalk Hospital Bauer Emergency Care Center, where the trauma team examined him immediately.

Full story at News Medical

SYMPTOMS POP UP EARLIER FOR KIDS OF PEOPLE WITH DEMENTIA

Family history, variations in certain genes, and medical conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes influence a person’s chance of developing dementia. But less clear are the factors that affect when the first symptoms of forgetfulness and confusion will arise.

Factors such as education, blood pressure, and carrying the genetic variant APOE4, which increases the risk of dementia, accounted for less than a third of the variation in the age at onset—meaning that more than two-thirds remains to be explained.

“It’s important to know who is going to get dementia, but it’s also important to know when symptoms will develop,” says first author Gregory Day, an assistant professor of neurology and an investigator at the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

Full story at Futurity

UAB orthopaedics investigates speeding up recovery after ankle fractures

Speeding up the recovery time for patients following ankle or tibial plateau fracture is the goal of a new study in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

The multi-center study, funded by the United States Department of Defense, will evaluate whether early weight-bearing following ankle or lower leg fractures will allow a patient to recover faster and return to work or duty more quickly.

The study will call for appropriate patients to begin weight-bearing two weeks after a surgical repair rather than the current standard of care: six to eight weeks following surgery for an ankle fracture and 10 to 12 weeks for a tibial plateau fracture. 

Full story at UAB

Physical therapy a potential application for ‘sensitive’ artificial skin

Engineers and roboticists in Europe have invented an artificial skin that can provide wearers with haptic feedback—replicating the human sense of touch—for potential applications in various fields, including medical rehabilitation and physical therapy.  

The work was conducted at Switzerland’s Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, aka “EPFL”) and published in Soft Robotics.

The artificial skin is soft and supple enough to flex with the wearer’s movements. Its haptic feedback mechanism uses sensors and signals to communicate pressure and vibration.

The team’s key innovation is the development of “an entirely soft artificial skin where both sensors and actuators are integrated,” explains PhD candidate Harshal Sonar, the study’s lead author, in a news item published by the school.

Full story at AI in Healthcare