What to expect from knee surgery rehabilitation

A person may have knee surgery to treat pain in the joint due to an injury, such as torn cartilage or a torn ligament. It can also treat other conditions, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

This article will look at the different types of knee surgery, the rehabilitation timelines, and what people can do to help speed up the recovery process.

Types of knee surgery

There are various types of knee surgery. The type that a person has will depend on the particular injury to the knee joint.

Full story at Medical New Todays

The Case For Taking a Walk After You Eat

At the end of a long day, it’s tempting to dive into your social feeds or Netflix queue the minute you’ve finished eating. But back before screens bogarted all our free time, an after-dinner stroll was a popular activity and one associated with improved health and digestion. “Italians have been walking after meals for centuries,” says Loretta DiPietro, a professor of exercise science at George Washington University’s Milken Institute School of Public Health, “so it must be good.”

Research backs this up. One small study co-authored by DiPietro found that when older adults at risk for type-2 diabetes walked on a treadmill for 15 minutes after a meal, they had smaller blood sugar spikes in the hours afterwards. In fact, the researchers found that these short post-meal walks were even more effective at lowering blood sugar after dinner than a single 45-minute walk taken at mid-morning or late in the afternoon.

The human digestive system converts food into the sugar glucose, which is one of the body’s primary energy sources—so after a meal, glucose floods a person’s bloodstream. Hormones like insulin help pull that glucose into cells, either to be used immediately or stored away for later use. But for people with diabetes and impaired insulin activity, too much glucose can remain in the blood, which can cause or contribute to heart disease, stroke, kidney disease and other health problems.

Full story at Time

Walking for 35 minutes a day could halve elderly people’s risk of having a severe stroke, study claims

A daily stroll could halve older people’s risk of a severe stroke, according to a study.

It found stroke victims who had taken regular 35-minute walks before being struck down were twice as likely to suffer milder attacks than those who hadn’t.

Study author Professor Katharina Sunnerhagen, of Gothenburg University in Sweden, said: ‘There is a growing body of evidence that physical activity may have a protective effect on the brain and our research adds to that evidence.’

The latest findings, published in the journal Neurology, were based on 925 people with an average age of 73 who had a stroke.

Full story at msn.com

More doctor visits can lower risk of suicide attempts in fibromyalgia patients

Fibromyalgia patients who regularly visit their physicians are much less likely to attempt suicide than those who do not, according to a new Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Arthritis Care & Research.

Patients who did not attempt suicide were at the doctor an average of 50 hours per year versus less than one hour per year for the group who committed self-harm, according to lead author Lindsey McKernan, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

“Fifty hours versus one hour – that’s a staggering difference,” McKernan said. “They might have been at one appointment in a year and this disorder, fibromyalgia, takes a lot to manage. It takes a lot of engagement.”

Full story at news-medical.net

APTA, Other Health Care Leaders Call for CMS to Rethink Evaluation and Management Payment Plan

APTA has joined with more than 150 other health care organizations to let the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) know that while its “Patients Over Paperwork” efforts are appreciated, one CMS attempt to reduce administrative burdens is likely to result in reduced access to care for some of the sickest Medicare beneficiaries.

The concerns center around a provision related to evaluation and management (E/M) visits included in the 2019 physician fee schedule rule proposed by CMS over the summer. The change, ostensibly intended to reduce paperwork, would collapse E/M payment rates currently based on a 5-level complexity system for new and established patients into what would amount to a 2-level system—combining levels 1-3 and levels 2-5. CMS acknowledges that the change would result in higher payments for E/M visits at the 1-3 levels while levels 4 and 5 will see reductions based on the 2019 proposed relative value units. However, CMS argues, the reduced paperwork burden would offset the payment drop.

In a letter sent to CMS last month, APTA and other cosigners praise CMS for its initiative to reduce provider paperwork, but question the wisdom of the E/M plan, arguing that the change would unfairly impact providers who see sicker patients, “ultimately jeopardizing patients’ access to care.”

Full story at APTA

How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the ankles?

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect the ankle joints in a similar way to other joints, causing stiffness, swelling, and pain.

Most often, rheumatoid arthritis or RA affects the hands and feet, but, less commonly, it can also affect the ankles.

The condition typically impacts on smaller joints first, such as the toe joints in the foot. It may then move to larger joints, such as the ankles. RA in the ankles can impede walking and cause considerable discomfort.

In this article, we take a close look at how RA affects the ankles, including the symptoms, and how people can relieve pain and swelling.

Full story at Medical News Today

Physical therapy for older adults may lead to fewer fall-related ED revisits

Falls are the leading cause of illness and death among Americans aged 65 and older. In 2014, some 2.8 million older adults visited the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury. And over time, the ED visit rate for falls among older adults has grown to 68.8 per 1,000 older adults (as of 2010).

Older adults who visit the ED for a fall are at high risk for both revisiting the ED and dying. In fact, some estimates show that 25 percent of older adults visiting the ED for a fall returned for at least one additional fall-related visit. Fifteen percent of those older adults died within the following year.

Because so many older adults visit an ED due to falls, many experts see an opportunity for EDs to play a role in reducing future falls among older adults who are at high risk.

Full story at news-medical.net

Treatment after Traumatic Shoulder Dislocation. A Systematic Review.

The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated large joint and it is often occurred by additional soft tissue injuries such as labral tears. Dislocations can occur in two directions: anterior and posterior with trauma being the leading cause of injury. Most often the trauma is from a posterolateral force on the shoulder with the arm in an abducted, externally rotated and extended position, dislocating the shoulder anteriorly. There are many other factors and causes which can contribute to a dislocation however let’s focus on trauma.

If you dislocate your shoulder, let’s say on the rugby field, there is usually only one treatment option and that is a closed reduction. This can happen immediately or once you arrive at a hospital in the emergency department either way it is potentially risky as may caused secondary damage. Interestingly there are over 20 different manoeuvres described for how to reduce a dislocated shoulder. If you’re interested in what technique to use and when to use it then there is a technical report linked below. *Disclaimer this article in no way suggests you should perform a reduction unless you have undergone appropriate training and have experience.*

Full story at Physiospot

Soleus strains and calf injuries: What to know

The soleus is a muscle in the calf that runs from directly behind the knee to just above the muscles around the ankle. The soleus is essential for everyday activities, such as running, walking, standing, dancing, and balancing.

Muscle injuries are the most common injuries in sports. Correctly diagnosing and treating muscle strain is vital for a full and speedy recovery. Identifying the injured muscle and getting suitable treatment can help prevent reinjury.

In this article, learn about soleus strains and other common calf injuries, as well as how to prevent and treat them.

Full story at Medical News Today

From PT in Motion Magazine: How to Defend Yourself Against Scams and Cyberattacks

As technology and information sharing evolves at a rapid pace, it becomes harder to keep up with criminals and scammers—even if you are an experienced professional. Last year, a staggering 83% of physicians said they had experienced some form of cyberattack, according to an American Medical Association report. What kind of scams are out there? What should you be wary of? What new threats are emerging?

A feature in this month’s PT in Motion magazine describes common cybercrimes and scams, including data breaches, phishing, and ransomware. Author Katherine Malmo reports that cyberattacks happen to more organizations than we might think, since people don’t want to share their experiences. Robert Latz, PT, DPT, told PT in Motion, “The question is less if there will be a breach and more what to do when the breach happens.”

Full story at APTA