Patients who live alone can safely be sent home after joint replacement

Most patients who live alone can be safely discharged home from the hospital to recover after hip or knee replacement surgery, suggests a study in the January 17, 2018 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

The results question the belief that patients who live alone should routinely be sent to an inpatient rehabilitation facility after total joint replacement surgery, before going home. “Patients living alone had a safe and manageable recovery when discharged directly home after total joint arthroplasty,” write Andrew N. Fleischman, MD, and colleagues from The Rothman Institute, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia.

Similar Outcomes after Joint Replacement for Patients Living Alone

The study included 769 patients who were discharged home after one-sided total hip or knee replacement. Of these, 138 patients were living alone for the first two weeks after surgery. The researchers compared complication rates and other important outcomes for patients who lived alone versus those who lived with others.

Full story at Medical Xpress

PTs’ Role in Joint Pain Management Highlighted in Letter to Editor

A recent Harvard Medical School newsletter article on nonsurgical approaches to joint pain came up short on information about the physical therapist’s (PT) role, and APTA weighed in to provide a more complete picture.

The association released a letter to the editor responding to a May 29 healthbeat newsletter article titled “4 ways to put off joint replacement.” The article listed weight loss, proper joint use, injections of steroids or other compounds, and pain reduction through NSAIDS, but made no mention of the ways in which a PT can help.

Full story of PT and joint replacement management at APTA