Study: Rethink Benefits of Antihypertensive Meds vs Risk of Serious Falls

For adults over 70, could the risk of falls due to the effects of antihypertensive medications outweigh the risks of not taking those medications? According to a recent study of nearly 5,000 community-living adults over 70 with hypertension, it’s a valid question that should be asked at the individual level.

In an article e-published ahead of print (abstract only available for free) in the February 24 issue of JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers led by Mary Tinetti, MD,concluded that “antihypertensive medications were associated with an increased risk of serious fall injuries,” with those taking antihypertensive medications who have already experienced a fall more than twice as likely to experience a subsequent serious fall than those who are not taking the drugs.

Full story of meds vs falls at PTA

FDA approves new diabetes medication

We now know that there’s much more to pain than simply what is happening in the painful body part, and attention has turned to the role of the brain. But not even this mysterious organ can tell us everything we need to know about pain, at least not yet.

You may wonder why the brain is part of the discussion about pain at all. After all, we’re not talking about a brain disease such as Alzheimer’s or stroke.

But we think that the brain is actually the best place to look when trying to understand pain; after all, pain is a purely subjective experience.

The problem is that pain cannot be “seen”. While a flinch, a limp, or a grimace may provide us with clues, ultimately we only know that someone is in pain if they tell us they are.

And it doesn’t necessarily make sense to only consider the part of the body that’s sore – sometimes people report pain in a body part that no longer exists, known as phantom limb pain.

Full story of FDA approving new diabetes drug at the Los Angeles Times