Large-Scale Investigation: Falls-Prevention Exercise Interventions Work

An extensive review of more than 100 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) strongly supports exercise interventions as a way to reduce both the risk of falls among adults 65 and older and the actual number of those who experience a fall. What’s less clear are some of the nuances of that finding—such as the effectiveness of resistance training or walking programs, and the differences between interventions provided by “health professionals” versus “trained providers who were not health professionals.”

The recently published Cochrane systematic review focused on 108 RCTs involving 23,407 community-dwelling adults in 25 countries. Participants were an average age of 76, and 77% were women. The majority of participants lived in the community, and RCTs that focused on participants with conditions that increased the risk of falls—Parkinson disease, stroke, multiple sclerosis, dementia, hip fracture, and severe visual impairment—were excluded.

The Cochrane reviewers analyzed various categories of exercise interventions versus control, which consisted of either no change in usual activities or an intervention not anticipated to reduce falls, such as health education, social visits, “gentle” exercises, or sham exercises. The exercise interventions were categorized as balance and functional; resistance; flexibility training; “3D” exercise including Tai Chi and Qigong; “3D” dance-based exercise; walking programs; endurance; “other”; and exercise interventions that included more than 1 of the studied categories.

Full story at APTA

FLEX CEUs: New CEU Courses

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND PAIN CONDITIONS

Pain in multiple sclerosis (MS) is a very common symptom.  The goals of this CEU course is to examine the occurrence of pain in MS patients, to identify the pain conditions and the relationship to important demographic variables, and to determine its impact on quality of life.  Also discussed in this course is the occurrence of central pain (CP) and its characteristics.

DANCER INJURIES AND WELLNESS

Dance participation, through its athletic nature can introduce risk of injury, but unlike sports, is not always recognized that specialist medicinal provision will assist in the mitigation of that risk.  This CEU course examines the extent of injury in dance participation and the impact that specialist dance medicine provision has on overall dance injury incidence, determines the effects of a ballet class on the levels of inflammation markers, and reviews the development and evaluation of a dancer wellness program.

Free Continuing Education for Life!

Did you know that we have a program available that gives you free continuing education for life? If this sounds like something you’re interested in, just visit https://www.flextherapistceus.com/account-refer.php to get all the details.

Flex: New CEU Courses

MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

Exercise is safe for people with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and is necessary to combat the secondary deconditioning resulting from MS-related weakness and fatigue.  The goals of this CEU course include reviewing the importance of physical fitness in persons with MS, examining if self-efficacy and physical activity have relationships with quality of life (QOL) in individuals with MS, investigating the perception of barriers and facilitators to exercise for those with MS, and comparing the effects of Pilaties, static stretching, and elastic bands resistance training.

CHILDHOOD OBESITY, EPIDEMIOLOGY, AND BONE THICKNESS

Childhood obesity is one of the most serious public health challenges of the 21st century.  Problems during the childhood and adolescence phases of the human development, during which the adult bone mass density is determined, could compromise bone health in adulthood.  The goal of this CEU course is to analyze the relationship between abdominal adipose tissue and bone mineral density (BMD) in obese children and adolescents.

For more information on these new courses and many more, visit Flex CEUs

Scrutinizing Medicare coverage for physical, occupational and speech therapy

For years, confusion has surrounded the conditions under which older adults can receive physical, occupational and speech therapy covered by Medicare.

Services have been terminated for some seniors, such as those with severe cases of multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s disease, because therapists said they weren’t making sufficient progress. Others, including individuals recovering from strokes or traumatic brain injuries, have been told that they reached an annual limit on services and didn’t qualify for further care.

Neither explanation stands up to scrutiny. Medicare does not require that older adults demonstrate improvement in order to receive ongoing therapy. Nor does it limit the amount of medically necessary therapy, for the most part.

Full story at news-medical.net

Music Therapy for MS: How Rhythm Can Help With Movement and Memory

Have you found yourself clumsier or less coordinated since you developed multiple sclerosis (MS)? Is your walking affected?

One approach that may give you your rhythm back is music therapy — a type of therapy that uses music to address physical, emotional, cognitive, or social needs of individuals.

How can music help with MS? Barbara Seebacher, PhD, a physiotherapist based in Innsbruck, Austria, explains:

“There are three different brain centers responsible for the timing of movement: the motor cortex, the basal ganglia, and the cerebellum. One or another of these can be damaged by stroke, Parkinson’s disease, or multiple sclerosis.”

Full story at Everyday Health

Move Forward Radio: Country Music’s Clay Walker Discusses Living With MS

It was just over 20 years ago, and multiplatinum country music star Clay Walker was riding high, on tour with his band, when he experienced a set of symptoms—poor balance, double vision, and what he calls “lazy legs”—that seemed almost funny at first; just some weird, passing thing. On the morning of the last show of his tour, Walker woke up expecting the joke to be over, the symptoms gone. They weren’t.

“That was a scary moment,” Walker said. “But that was when I knew that I should probably get to a doctor.”

It didn’t take long for Walker to learn that he had multiple sclerosis (MS). His first 2 doctors told him that would be in a wheelchair in 4 years, and likely dead in 8. But here it is, 2 decades later, and Walker is still on his feet, still touring, and still living life to the fullest—thanks, he says, to his faith, an excellent physician, appropriate medications, and a mobility “protocol” he learned from his physical therapist (PT).

Full story of Clay Walker’s life with MS at APTA

Can nerve endings in the tongue help us treat traumatic brain injury?

Tongue Nerve Endings and TBIThe human tongue is an extraordinary bit of flesh. It’s alternately squishy and tense, at times delicate and others powerful. It helps us taste, talk and tie cherry stems, all the while avoiding two interlocking rows of sharpened enamel that know only how to gnash. Now, it seems the tongue may even serve as a gateway to the human brain, providing us with the opportunity to treat serious afflictions from multiple sclerosis to combat-induced brain injuries.

The tongue is a natural candidate for electrical stimulation, thanks in part to a high density of sensory receptors and the concentration of electrolytes found in saliva. This has allowed researchers at the Tactile Communication and Neurorehabilitation Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison to develop a pattern of electrodes that can be placed on the tongue and attached to a control box. All together, the system is called a Portable Neuromodulation Stimulator (PoNS).

Full story of the tongue and TBI at Niagara Gazette

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