Tag: nursing

APTA Members: Important PT Evaluation and Reevaluation Code Values Survey Coming; Your Input Critical

APTA members are being alerted to be on the lookout for an important survey that will help to shape values for PT evaluation and reevaluation current procedural terminology (CPT) codes.

In the coming weeks, a random sampling of APTA members will receive a survey that focuses on CPT codes related to physical therapist evaluations and reevaluations. The survey is designed to determine the “professional work” value and time involved in the physical therapist’s provision of the services identified by each of these codes.

“Professional work value” includes the mental effort and judgment, technical skill, and psychological stress involved in providing the service.

Full story of PT evaluation code values at APTA

Higher Proportion of Vigorous Physical Activity Lowers Mortality Risk

A new study from Australia concludes that while achieving at least the minimum amount of recommended weekly physical activity is key to a lower mortality risk, upping the amount of vigorous physical activity in an individual’s exercise mix can reduce that risk even further.

In an 8-year observational study of 204,542 New South Wales adults aged 45 to 75, researchers paired mortality statistics with percentages of moderate to vigorous activity (MVPA) to find out whether the proportion of vigorous activity had an impact on mortality risk.

Full story of vigorous physical activity and mortality risk at APTA

Did Physical Therapy Transform a Life? Tell Us Your Story

If there’s 1 thing physical therapists and physical therapist assistants know a thing or 2 about, it’s patient transformation, and how physical therapy can make a very real difference in the life of a patient.

There are some great stories out there, and now it’s time to share them.

APTA is celebrating the transformative power of physical therapy by collecting powerful stories of patients to share at MoveForwardPT.com, APTA’s official consumer information website, and via social media. If you have a current or former patient or client whose life has been transformed by physical therapy, please share it, or encourage the individual to do so. Submission instructions are available in the Patient Stories section of MoveForwardPT.com. Deadline for submissions is Monday, March 30, 2015.

To tell your story, visit APTA

 

Joint Commission Seeks Comments on New Integrated Care Certification Program

The Joint Commission is seeking feedback on standards for a voluntary integrated care certification program for accredited hospitals, critical access hospitals, and ambulatory health care organizations.

According to an announcement from the commission, the aim of the program is to “provide a pathway for hospitals and ambulatory care settings to demonstrate that they can come together to deliver clinically coordinated care, treatment and services.” The commission believes that the most likely candidates for certification are accredited organizations in the early stages of establishing or seeking to strengthen their ambulatory-hospital relationships.

Full story of new integrated care program at APTA

APTA Helps Consumers Choose ‘Sabiamente’

The debut of a Spanish-language version of APTA’s Choosing Wisely® list of “5 things physical therapists and patients should question” will help APTA do more to get the word out about the importance of informed communication between patients and health care providers.

The translated consumer-friendly summary is available at MoveForwardPT.com and joins multiple resources that provide education on APTA’s participation in the Choosing Wisely campaign developed by American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Foundation. The initiative aims to help consumers make informed health care choices by providing lists of procedures that tend to be done frequently, yet whose usefulness is called into question by evidence. Consumer Reports partners with the ABIM Foundation and APTA to share the lists with the public.

Full story of communication between patients and providers at APTA

Foot osteoarthritis affects one in six over 50s

Experts at Keele University’s Arthritis Research UK Primary Care Centre studied more than 5,000 people with painful foot osteoarthritis.

The condition is caused by inflammation in and around the joints, damage to cartilage and swelling. People can suffer a range of symptoms including pain, stiffness and difficulty moving and often have osteoarthritis in other joints, such as hips or knees.

The study found that foot osteoarthritis affects more women than men, while those who have spent a lot of time in manual work are more likely to develop it.

Three-quarters of people with the condition reported having difficulty with simple day-to-day activities such as walking, standing, housework and shopping.

Dr Edward Roddy, clinical senior lecturer in rheumatology at Keele University, said the research had focussed on “midfoot” joints, which previous studies have neglected to do.

He said a “substantial proportion of people” with painful foot osteoarthritis have the problem in this area, meaning there has been a previous underestimate in how common it is.

Full story of foot osteoarthritis over 50 at Nursing Times 

How best to celebrate Christmas with a person with dementia

Christmas can be a stressful time for hosts and guests alike, and it’s more so for carers of people living with dementia.

It’s difficult to give general advice about how to get through the holiday season with as little fuss as possible because everyone is unique, and the various types and stages of dementia affect behaviour in different ways.

So I’m going to tell you a story of how one couple is getting through. Hopefully, their strategies will suggest things other families can do for a better Christmas.

Tom and Nola are not real people. Their portraits below are based on my experience working with people with dementia, and on conversations I’ve had with these people, their carers and service providers about how to cope at Christmas time.

Tailoring Christmas

Tom was diagnosed with dementia about three years ago.

“My memory is not so good now,” he says. But Nola, his wife and carer, says that he’s still sociable and enjoys food and company.

Full story of celebrating Christmas with Dementia at The Conversation

FLEX CEUs: New Courses for November

Tennis Elbow – Treatment Approaches

Tennis elbow, also know as lateral epicondylalgia or lateral epicondylosis,  is a prevalent disorder characterized by degeneration of the extensor tendon resulting in biomechanical and sensorimotor deficits that may interfere with occupational tasks, activities of daily living, and sports. This course reviews two articles; the first evaluates relationships between self-reported pain and function, and measures of tendon pathology and biomechanics in individuals with tennis elbow. The second presents an unconventional treatment approach to the commonly used intervention by examing the effects of exercises that change scapular strength and position on an individual with tennis elbow.

Knee Pain – Surgical Options for Meniscus Repair and Articular Cartilage Injuries

This course reviews two articles that explore surgical options for meniscus repair and articular cartilage injuries. Innovative approaches to treating symptomatic lesions of the knee’s articular surface are discussed in the first article. Surgical options reviewed include; arthroscopic lavage and debridement, microfracture, autologous chondrocyte implantation, osteochondral autograft transfer system and osteochondral allograft transplantation. The second article reviews clinical signs found during a clinical evaluation that indicate a meniscus tear. The indications for meniscus repair and/or meniscus transplantation are presented and both of these operative techniques are discussed in detail.

Company CEU Referral

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Spread the word and help us bring quality, affordable continuing education to everyone!

Visit us at Flex CEUs

Occupational therapists produce care home activity toolkit

For too long activity has been seen as an add-on in care homes, despite being a minimum requirement in care home standards throughout the UK.

I’ve seen some excellent care homes that support residents to be involved in the life of the home, but many still struggle to balance the demands of daily tasks and patient-focused care.

Having worked as an occupational therapist for nearly 25 years, I believe moving into a care home means a person needs 24-hour support but that doesn’t mean they want, or have to, give up doing the activities that are important to them. Occupational therapy’s core belief is that activity is essential to our health and wellbeing and it’s this expertise that can lead a change in culture. To offer a practical resource to the sector, I worked with my colleague Julia Roberts to develop the College of Occupational Therapists’ Living well through activity in care homes toolkit.

Since the toolkit launched, we’ve been overwhelmed by the response with over 1,200 care home staff, commissioners, health and social care professionals signing up to support it. We are already seeing examples of its use – as a resource for commissioning a care village in Leeds and for training care staff in London.

The toolkit calls for activity as a shared responsibility between managers, staff, residents, family and friends. Its design has been carefully considered. Different sections for each group can be viewed online or printed off in bite-sized chunks. We asked: What can we produce that is accessible, influences culture and is flexible to meet the needs of different audiences?

Full story of occupational therapy take home kit at The Guardian

Occupational therapists produce care home activity toolkit

For too long activity has been seen as an add-on in care homes, despite being a minimum requirement in care home standards throughout the UK.

I’ve seen some excellent care homes that support residents to be involved in the life of the home, but many still struggle to balance the demands of daily tasks and patient-focused care.

Having worked as an occupational therapist for nearly 25 years, I believe moving into a care home means a person needs 24-hour support but that doesn’t mean they want, or have to, give up doing the activities that are important to them. Occupational therapy’s core belief is that activity is essential to our health and wellbeing and it’s this expertise that can lead a change in culture. To offer a practical resource to the sector, I worked with my colleague Julia Roberts to develop the College of Occupational Therapists’ Living well through activity in care homes toolkit.

Since the toolkit launched, we’ve been overwhelmed by the response with over 1,200 care home staff, commissioners, health and social care professionals signing up to support it. We are already seeing examples of its use – as a resource for commissioning a care village in Leeds and for training care staff in London.

The toolkit calls for activity as a shared responsibility between managers, staff, residents, family and friends. Its design has been carefully considered. Different sections for each group can be viewed online or printed off in bite-sized chunks. We asked: What can we produce that is accessible, influences culture and is flexible to meet the needs of different audiences?

Full story of occupational therapy take home kit at The Guardian