Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries

Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury.

The early-stage findings, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, come from studies in mice and rats with spinal cord injuries, in which scientists uncovered a mechanism for nerve fibres repairing after they had been damaged.

An international team, led by researchers from Imperial College London, found that providing rodents with more space, an exercise wheel, toys and company before an injury helped to ‘prime’ their cells, making it more likely their damaged nerves would regenerate following spinal injury.

Full story at Medical Xpress

Maximal running shoes may raise injury risk even after transition period

A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to “maximal” running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time, a new study from Oregon State University – Cascades has found.

The shoes, which feature increased cushioning, particularly in the forefoot region of the midsole, affect runners’ biomechanics, leaving them at increased risk of injury, said Christine Pollard, director of the Bend campus’s Functional Orthopedic Research Center of Excellence (FORCE) Lab and a co-author of the study.

“These shoes may work for certain people, but right now we just don’t know who they are good for,” said Pollard, an associate professor of kinesiology at OSU-Cascades. “The findings suggest that people aren’t really changing the way they run in the shoes, even after a six-week transition, potentially leaving them at increased risk of injury.”

Full story at news-medical.net

Maximal running shoes may raise injury risk even after transition period

A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to “maximal” running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time, a new study from Oregon State University – Cascades has found.

The shoes, which feature increased cushioning, particularly in the forefoot region of the midsole, affect runners’ biomechanics, leaving them at increased risk of injury, said Christine Pollard, director of the Bend campus’s Functional Orthopedic Research Center of Excellence (FORCE) Lab and a co-author of the study.

“These shoes may work for certain people, but right now we just don’t know who they are good for,” said Pollard, an associate professor of kinesiology at OSU-Cascades. “The findings suggest that people aren’t really changing the way they run in the shoes, even after a six-week transition, potentially leaving them at increased risk of injury.”

Full story at news-medical.net

Torn rotator cuff: Everything you need to know

A torn rotator cuff is a common injury that affects a person’s ability to lift and rotate their arm.

According to the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, an estimated 2 million people in the United States will visit a doctor for a rotator cuff problem each year.

The rotator cuff is four muscles connected by tendons to the humerus, or upper portion of the shoulder.

When a rotator cuff tear occurs, one or more of the tendons detaches from the humerus. The tear may be complete or partial and can cause significant pain and restrict movement.

Full story at Medical News Today

PTJ: Falls Are ‘Critical Health Hazard’ for Individuals With Upper Limb Loss

Arm motion is critical to helping compensate for losing one’s balance and avoiding a fall. For individuals with upper limb loss (ULL), the lower extremities take on the burden of reacting to avoid a fall, and the lack of upper arm movement may put them at greater risk for falls than older individuals, say authors of a new study in PTJ (Physical Therapy). This “critical health hazard,” they write, requires falls screening and “targeted physical therapy to enhance postural control and minimize fall risk.”

Via an anonymous online survey, researchers asked 109 individuals with an average age of 43 with ULL about their body and health characteristics, upper and lower limb loss characteristics, physical activity level, fall history in the previous year and circumstances, and upper limb prosthesis use. Participants also completed the the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale.

Full story at APTA

What to know about hamstring tendonitis

Tendonitis, or tendinitis, happens when a tendon either swells or sustains tiny tears. Tendonitis usually develops over time. For some people, however, it is a sudden injury. It is possible for tendonitis to get better with home treatment and gentle exercise, especially when people begin treatment early.

Hamstring tendonitis is an injury to one or both of the hamstring tendons, which are part of the thick band of muscles and tendons called the hamstrings. The hamstring tendons connect the hamstring muscles to the pelvis, knee, and shinbones.

As the hamstrings help the knee bend, an injury to either the tendons or the muscles can cause knee pain and difficulty walking or bending the knee. People often develop tendonitis because of overuse.

Full story at Medical News Today

New Pilot Study Opportunities Available From CoHSTAR

The Center on Health Services Training and Research (CoHSTAR) has opened a call for the development of multiple pilot studies that would help set the stage for larger efforts to advance a wide range of health services research. APTA was a major financial contributor to the development of CoHSTAR, having donated $1 million toward the center’s startup in 2015.

The selected pilot studies would address research questions in CoHSTAR’s 4 areas of specialization—analysis of large data sets, rehabilitation outcome measurement, cost-effectiveness, and implementation of science and quality improvement research—and the CoHSTAR Pilot Study Program webpage lists examples of specific types of studies that would qualify for funding. Each pilot study will receive $25,000 in funding for direct costs.

Priorities for funding will be given to applications that align with 1 of the 4 areas of CoHSTAR specialization, have a strong likelihood of leading to broader research with major external funding, and have good potential to result in future research with high societal or policy impact for physical therapy. Principal investigators must include at least 1 physical therapist (PT) who is a US citizen or a certified permanent resident of the United States.

Full story at APTA

JAMA Oncology: Telerehab Makes a Difference in Patients With Advanced-Stage Cancer

“Collaborative telerehabilitation” isn’t a regular part of care for patients with advanced-stage cancer, but maybe it should be, say authors of a study recently published in JAMA Oncology.They found that the approach, which combines remotely delivered rehabilitation instruction with outpatient physical therapy and regular communication, can reduce pain, improve function, shorten hospital says, and decrease the use of postacute care facilities.

The findings are based on results from the Collaborative Care to Preserve Performance in Cancer (COPE) program, a randomized clinical trial designed to address what the JAMA authors describe as a “knowledge gap” in the application of collaborative care models (CCMs) focused on patient function. The COPE trial includes patients with stage III or IV solid or hematologic cancer with a life expectancy of more than 6 months, and who reported moderate functional impairment (a score of 53-60 on the Activity Measure for Postacute Care assessment, or AM-PAC).

Full story at APTA

Can blocking a single protein tackle depression, obesity, and pain?

Depression, obesity, and chronic pain are some of the most pressing global health concerns. New research may have found a drug that could one day tackle all of these three conditions.

Almost 40 percent of adults in the United States were living with obesity in 2015–2016. Worldwide, nearly 40 percent of adults are overweight, and 13 percent of them have obesity.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), depression is the leading cause of disability across the globe. In the U.S., over 17 million adults have experienced at least one episode of major depression in their lives.

Full story at Medical News Today

Small changes can go far in preventing childhood obesity

In the United States, the percentage of children and adolescents with obesity has more than tripled since 1970. Today, approximately one in five school-aged children (ages 6 to 19) is obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—and that figure doesn’t include children who are considered merely overweight and not obese.

According to Dr. Alka Sood, a family medicine physician with Penn State Health Medical Group – Park Avenue in State College, Pennsylvania, children with obesity face physical, social and emotional hurdles while growing up.

“Children with obesity are more likely than their classmates to be teased or bullied and to suffer from low self-esteem, social isolation and depression,” Sood said. “They are at higher risk for other chronic health problems, including asthma, sleep apnea, bone and joint problems, and type 2 diabetes, and are more likely to be obese as adults— resulting in increased risk of heart disease and other serious medical conditions.”

Full story at Medical Xpress