If you’ve got MS, exercise means much more than moving

For people with multiple sclerosis, the meaning of exercise stretches way beyond health and keeping fit, shows new research revealing what life’s really like with the condition.

From a way to cope and a road to freedom, through to sparking a sense of loss, for people with MS the idea of exercise and physical activity is shown to signify several things.

Two and a half million people worldwide have the condition, which damages nerves in the brain and spinal cord. And exercise and physical activity are shown to ease symptoms.

Researchers at Brunel University London carried out in-depth interviews with people with MS to find out how they really think and feel about exercise and physical activity.

Full story at Medical Xpress

 

Associations of grip strength with cardiovascular, respiratory, and cancer outcomes and all cause mortality

In a nutshell previous studies have demonstrated an association between low grip strength and poor health outcomes (in other words increased mortality). On the whole previous studies have had too small sample sizes to detect disease specific mortality and have been unable to clearly show relationship with age. The Biobank study has an adequate number of participants, some 500,000, to be able to detect disease and age specific nuances in this relationship.

Some serious math too place in the analysis of the study’s findings and I’m not the one to talk you through the finer details. In essence lower grip strength was strongly associated with adverse health outcomes. This was consistent between gender and remained robust after adjustment for socioeconomic factors. Compared to other commonly used tools grip strength is arguably as reliable as systolic BP and low levels of physical activity to predict a person’s poor overall health.

Full story at Physiospot

CDC: 40% of Patients With Arthritis Don’t Receive Exercise Counseling From Providers

Better, but still plenty of room for improvement—that’s the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) take on a recent analysis of the rate at which health care providers are counseling patients with arthritis to engage in physical activity (PA). The good news: the percentage of individuals with arthritis who received provider counseling for exercise grew by 17.6% between 2002 and 2014. The bad news: even after that growth, nearly 4 in 10 patients with arthritis still aren’t receiving any information from their providers on the benefits of PA.

The CDC analysis, which appeared in a recent edition of its Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, uses data from the National Health Interview Survey gathered in 2002 and 2014. In those years, the survey included a question on whether respondents had been told they have “arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia,” as well as a question asking whether “a doctor or other health professional [has] ever suggested physical activity or exercise to help your arthritis or joint symptoms?”

Full story at APTA

Study: Even Small Amounts of PA Can Reduce CVD Risk Among the Elderly

It’s no secret that physical activity (PA) can decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in middle-aged adults, but researchers in England have found that the relationship also applies to the elderly, and that even small amounts of PA can markedly lower the chances of CVD hospitalization and death in this age group.

Researchers used data from the EPIC study, a 10-country prospective population study, to track CVD-related hospitalizations and deaths among 24,502 participants, aged 39-79 years, and compare those with participants’ self-reported PA. This isn’t the first study of its kind, but authors believe it is notable because of its focus on participants 65 and older, and its 18-year median follow-up duration—a relatively long time span that allowed researchers to follow some participants into old age. Findings were published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

Full story at APTA

Perceiving oneself as less physically active than peers is linked to a shorter lifespan

Would you say that you are physically more active, less active, or about equally active as other people your age?

Your answer might be linked to your risk of premature death decades from now — no matter how physically active you actually are, according to research by Stanford scholars Octavia Zahrt and Alia Crum.

The research, appearing July 20 in Health Psychology, finds that people who think they are less active than others in a similar age bracket die younger than those who believe they are more active — even if their actual activity levels are similar.

Full story at Science Daily

Study: Chemical ‘Marker’ Sheds Light on Cognitive Benefits of Aerobic Exercise Among Older Adults

The connection between physical activity (PA) and the slowing or prevention of cognitive decline in the elderly has been widely recognized, but an explanation of just how PA works on the brain’s chemistry has been more elusive. Now researchers in Germany believe they’ve isolated a chemical marker that helps identify PA’s neuroprotective effects.

The research project itself was fairly straightforward: split 53 cognitively healthy individuals 65 and older into 2 groups—the first of which received 3 half-hour supervised cycle training sessions per week for 12 weeks, and the second of which did not increase their PA—and then measure a host of factors associated with cognitive decline at the beginning and end of the 12-week training program. Researchers didn’t limit their investigation to chemical markers but also included evaluations of gray matter volume and cognitive performance tests. Results were published in Translational Psychiatry.

Full story of chemical marker helps identify PA’s neuroprotective effects at APTA

Low physical activity increases risk of bladder, kidney cancer

Most of us know that physical activity is good for us. But a new study shows that a chronic lack of physical activity can drastically increase the chance of developing cancer in the bladder and kidneys, and it suggests that engaging in more physical activity may reduce this risk.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that, every year, almost 57,000 adults have kidney and renal pelvis cancers in the United States. Additionally, almost 14,000 people per year die from these cancers.

Bladder cancer is also widespread. According to the CDC, around 71,000 U.S. individuals developed bladder cancer in 2013, and almost 16,000 people died as a result.

Full story of physical activity and bladder cancer at Medical News Today

Six fixes for anterior pelvic tilt

Some research suggests that as many as 85 percent of men and 75 percent of women, who do not show any symptoms, have an anterior pelvic tilt.

Anterior pelvic tilt is caused by excessive sitting or lack of physical activity. It affects posture and the shape of the spine, and may lead to other symptoms.

In cases of anterior pelvic tilt, the pelvis can gradually be returned to a neutral position, using a variety of stretching and strengthening exercises. These exercises include the following:

Full list for the pelvic tilt, visit Medical News Today

Early Physical Activity After Concussion May Reduce Risk of Persistent Symptoms, Researchers Say

A Canadian study published in JAMA turns the current thinking on postconcussion physical activity on its head. According to researchers, early return to physical activity within 1 week of concussion may actually decrease the likelihood of persistent symptoms in the pediatric population.

The prospective cohort study included 2,413 children and adolescents between the ages of 5 and 18 years. At 7 days and at 28 days postinjury, participants filled out questionnaires about their physical activity and rated their postconcussion symptoms using the Post-Concussion Symptom Inventory. Of the respondents, 30.5% rested for the first 7 days, and 69.5% participated in some sort of physical activity, including light aerobic exercise, sport-specific exercise, noncontact drills, full-contact practice, or full competition.

Full story of physical activity benefits after concussions at APTA

Sports and Recreation-Related Injuries Top 8.6 Million Annually

A growing number of Americans may be engaging in physical activity, but that also means a growing number of Americans are getting injured while doing so—to the tune of about 8.6 million episodes in 2014, according to a recent study from the US Department of Health and Human Services. The analysis, based on National Health Interview Survey data from 2011 to 2014, also sheds light on where injuries are taking place, what activities were involved, and what areas of the body are most often affected.

Authors of the study claim their analysis is the first to take a broad look at recreation-related injuries by using data that reflects, among other things, all medically attended injuries, not just emergency department (ED) visits. They write that focusing solely on ED data “may underestimate the overall burden of injury from sports and recreation activities.”

Full story of growing number of sports related injuries at APTA