More doctor visits can lower risk of suicide attempts in fibromyalgia patients

Fibromyalgia patients who regularly visit their physicians are much less likely to attempt suicide than those who do not, according to a new Vanderbilt University Medical Center study published in Arthritis Care & Research.

Patients who did not attempt suicide were at the doctor an average of 50 hours per year versus less than one hour per year for the group who committed self-harm, according to lead author Lindsey McKernan, PhD, assistant professor of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.

“Fifty hours versus one hour – that’s a staggering difference,” McKernan said. “They might have been at one appointment in a year and this disorder, fibromyalgia, takes a lot to manage. It takes a lot of engagement.”

Full story at news-medical.net

A recipe for regenerating nerve fibers across complete spinal cord injury

Neuroscientists at UCLA, Harvard University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology have identified a three-pronged treatment that triggers axons—the tiny fibers that link our nerve cells and enable them to communicate—to regrow after complete spinal cord injury in rodents. Not only did the axons grow through scars, they could also transmit signals across the damaged tissue.

If researchers can produce similar results in human studies, the findings could lead to a therapy to restore axon connections in people living with spinal cord injury. Nature publishes the research in its Aug. 29 online edition.

“The idea was to deliver a sequence of three very different treatments and test whether the combination could stimulate disconnected axons to regrow across the scar in the injured spinal cord,” said lead author Michael Sofroniew, a professor of neurobiology at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. “Previous studies had tested each of the three treatments separately, but never together. The combination proved to be the key.”

Full story at Medical Xpress

PT, PTA, Student Involvement in Special Olympics is Improving Health…and Changing Attitudes

Vicki Tilley, PT, and Donna Bainbridge, PT, ATC, EdD, wanted to make a difference in the lives of others by working with Special Olympics. Along the way, Special Olympics returned the favor.

“I have a different lens now,” Tilley said. “Being able to engage, explore, and interact with the ID [intellectual disabilities] population in a way that’s positive has changed the way I think about people in general, and about inclusion and access.”

“My experiences with Special Olympics have shaped my entire career path in practice, research, and programming,” Bainbridge added. “I have a better understanding of the health needs of individuals with ID, and what we as physical therapists can do to improve the lives and function of people with ID at all ages.”

As Special Olympics celebrates its 50th year, Tilley and Bainbridge are marking their 19th year with the program, and their 18th with “Healthy Athletes,” an initiative that brings health professionals and students from multiple disciplines to provide education, screenings, and other services to athletes. Both were instrumental in the creation of FUNfitness, the branch of Healthy Athletes responsible for screenings and education around balance, strength, flexibility, and aerobics fitness. FUNfitness is primarily performed by physical therapists (PTs), physical therapist assistants (PTAs), and students.

Full story at APTA

HSS takes young patients with physical challenges on a surfing trip

Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) made a splash this week with a surfing trip for young patients. Giving new meaning to the term “patient care,” the Adaptive Sports Academy at Lerner Children’s Pavilion at HSS treated 12 patients, along with some of their siblings, to sand and surf in Long Beach, Long Island.

The Academy enables young people with cerebral palsy or another physical challenge to experience the benefits of exercise. The program’s trips and recreational experiences aim to build their self-confidence, encourage independence, and increase physical activity and mobility. The excursions are offered without cost, thanks to the generosity of donors.

Adaptive surfing and other activities are competitive or recreational sports for people with disabilities. Sometimes rules or equipment is modified to meet the needs of participants. Some are understandably nervous at first, but they almost always exceed their own expectations and have a blast.

Full story at news-medical.net

Physical therapy for older adults may lead to fewer fall-related ED revisits

Falls are the leading cause of illness and death among Americans aged 65 and older. In 2014, some 2.8 million older adults visited the emergency department (ED) for a fall-related injury. And over time, the ED visit rate for falls among older adults has grown to 68.8 per 1,000 older adults (as of 2010).

Older adults who visit the ED for a fall are at high risk for both revisiting the ED and dying. In fact, some estimates show that 25 percent of older adults visiting the ED for a fall returned for at least one additional fall-related visit. Fifteen percent of those older adults died within the following year.

Because so many older adults visit an ED due to falls, many experts see an opportunity for EDs to play a role in reducing future falls among older adults who are at high risk.

Full story at news-medical.net

What are the causes of unexplained muscle aches?

Muscle aches can occur in adults and children. In many cases, sore and aching muscles are nothing to worry about and will resolve without medical treatment. However, muscle aches can sometimes be a symptom of an underlying illness.

Common causes of muscle aches include:

  • overexertion
  • trauma to an area of the body
  • viral infections

Muscle aches, also known as myalgia, can be felt in any area of the body that has muscles. Depending on the cause, the discomfort may be mild or extremely severe.

Full story at Medical News Today

Treatment after Traumatic Shoulder Dislocation. A Systematic Review.

The shoulder is the most commonly dislocated large joint and it is often occurred by additional soft tissue injuries such as labral tears. Dislocations can occur in two directions: anterior and posterior with trauma being the leading cause of injury. Most often the trauma is from a posterolateral force on the shoulder with the arm in an abducted, externally rotated and extended position, dislocating the shoulder anteriorly. There are many other factors and causes which can contribute to a dislocation however let’s focus on trauma.

If you dislocate your shoulder, let’s say on the rugby field, there is usually only one treatment option and that is a closed reduction. This can happen immediately or once you arrive at a hospital in the emergency department either way it is potentially risky as may caused secondary damage. Interestingly there are over 20 different manoeuvres described for how to reduce a dislocated shoulder. If you’re interested in what technique to use and when to use it then there is a technical report linked below. *Disclaimer this article in no way suggests you should perform a reduction unless you have undergone appropriate training and have experience.*

Full story at Physiospot

Study: Estimated 1 in 3 Medicare Beneficiaries Receiving Inpatient/SNF Rehab Report No Improvement in Function

Authors of a new study on inpatient and skilled nursing facility (SNF) rehabilitation say that when it comes to patients’ own opinions of their progress, an estimated 1 in 3 Medicare beneficiaries are likely to report experiencing no improvement in functioning while they were receiving rehabilitation in those settings. And those rates can trend higher depending on certain demographic and health-related variables.

The study, published in the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, analyzes survey responses from 479 Medicare beneficiaries who received inpatient or SNF rehabilitation between 2015 and 2016. Data were drawn from the National Health and Aging Trends Study (NHATS), with respondents comprising a nationally representative sample of the Medicare population.

Full story at APTA

Following pitch count guidelines may help young baseball players prevent injuries

Young pitchers who exceed pitch count limits are more prone to elbow injuries, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine’s Annual Meeting in San Diego. Season statistics of players were compared relative to pitch count limits established by the Japanese Society of Clinical Sports Medicine.

“Our research focused on 149 young pitchers ranging in age from 7 to 11 who had no prior elbow pain,” commented lead author Toshiyuki Iwame, MD, from Tokushima University in Tokushima, Japan. “We found those who reported elbow pain after the season were associated with pitching numbers beyond current throwing guidelines.”

Researchers asked the players to complete a questionnaire after the season, which showed 66 (44.3%) experienced pain. Multivariate analysis showed that throwing more than 50 pitches per day (OR, 2.44; 95% CI, 1.22-4.94), 200 pitches per week (OR, 2.04; 95% CI, 1.03-4.10), and 70 games per year (OR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.24-5.02), the baselines established by the JSCSM, were risk factors for pain.

Full story at Science Daily

Team sports have ancient roots

Competitive team games in which men test their mettle against others are universal across the world, and may have deep roots in our evolutionary past. Among hunter-gatherers, these games enable men to hone their physical skills and stamina, assess the commitment of their team members, and see how each performs under pressure. All these activities suggest motivation to practise skills involved in lethal raiding, says Michelle Scalise Sugiyama of the University of Oregon in the US, lead author of a study in Springer’s journal Human Nature.

Play behavior in humans and other animals is thought to have evolved as a way to develop, rehearse, and refine skills that are critical for survival or reproduction. Chase games, for instance, build stamina and speed, which is helpful for evading predators. Similarly, play fighting is believed to develop skills used in actual fighting. Although many animals play fight, only people do so in teams. The study’s findings suggest that team play fighting is not a recent invention of agricultural societies.

Full story at Science Daily