Results support physical therapy or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in degenerative knees

Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was as effective as physical therapy in patients with degenerative knees and a confirmed meniscal tear that was non-obstructive, according to results of a multicenter study presented at the EFORT Annual Congress.

At the meeting, Victor A. van de Graaf, MD, Rudolf W. Poolman, MD, PhD, and colleagues at OLVG Ziekenhuis in Amsterdam received the EFORT Gold Orthopedics Free Paper Award, which designated their paper as the best one in the orthopedic category at the congress.

Participants in the study, which was conducted at six hospitals in the Netherlands, were consented and then randomized 1:1 to either arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) or physical therapy (PT). They were also stratified by age into a group of patients aged 45 to 57 years and a group aged 58 to 70 years.

The mean improvement in the IKDC score from baseline to the 24-month follow-up was the primary outcome, results of which were more favorable for the APM group.

Full story at Healio

Customized resistance exercise helps female fibromyalgia patients improve health

Fibromyalgia and resistance exercise have often been considered an impossible combination. But with proper support and individually adjusted exercises, female patients achieved considerable health improvements, according to research carried out at Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden.

“If the goal for these women is to improve their strength, then they shouldn’t be afraid to exercise, but they need to exercise the right way. It has long been said that they will only experience more pain as a result of resistance exercise, that it doesn’t work. But in fact, it does,” says Anette Larsson, whose dissertation was in physical therapy and who is an active physical therapist.

As part of her dissertation, she studied 130 women aged between 20-65 years with fibromyalgia, a disease in which nine of ten cases are women. It is characterized by widespread muscle pain and increased pain sensitivity, often combined with fatigue, reduced physical capacity and limitation of activities in daily life.

Full story at news-medical.net

10 Common Misconceptions About Pelvic Physical Therapy | Pelvic Guru

Have you ever heard of pelvic physical therapy before? Many have not, but this specialty can be a crucial part of someone’s complete medical care – for women, men, and even children. As one my patients recently said,  “I had no idea this sort of thing exists, but I’m sure glad I found it because it has been THE missing treatment I have needed for years!”.

I had never heard of pelvic physical therapy prior to beginning my doctoral program at Duke University. I remember very clearly when I first learned that some physical therapists did “that.” One of my fellow students had completed a small half-day observation at a local clinic, and excitedly told us all about his day watching the “Pelvic PTs.” We were blown away. We had always assumed physical therapists treated back pain, helped patients after surgery, worked with people who had strokes…but pelvic pain? Urinary incontinence? Sexual dysfunction? This was shocking and new.

Full story at Austin Surgical Institute

Pitcher injuries increase as pitch count rises

More than half of high school baseball pitchers report experiencing pain in their throwing arms during the season. To better understand the cause of these injuries, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to determine when and why overuse injuries are occurring.

“We found that the number of injuries peaked early — only about four weeks in — and then slowly declined until the end of the season,” said James Onate, associate professor of health and rehabilitation sciences at the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute. “We see a lot of kids who didn’t prepare in the off-season and, when their workload goes through the roof, they’re not prepared for the demand of throwing.”

To accurately assess the timing and severity of their pain, 97 high school pitchers were asked to submit a weekly questionnaire via text message.

Full story at Science Daily

How is psoriatic arthritis different from osteoarthritis?

Psoriatic arthritis and osteoarthritis are types of arthritis. Psoriatic arthritis is an autoimmune disorder that happens to some people who have psoriasis. Osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition that occurs when the cartilage at the end of the bone wears away.

Arthritis is a term used to describe over 100 conditions that cause joint pain or joint damage. Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common type of arthritis, affecting over 30 million Americans.

Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and OA share some common symptoms, but there are also some key differences between the conditions.

Full story at Medical News Today

Stroke survivors may benefit from magnetic brain stimulation

A new meta-analysis of existing studies shows that a technique called repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation might be a useful tool to help stroke survivors regain the ability to walk independently.

Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation(rTMS) is a noninvasive brain stimulation technique; magnetic coils are placed on a person’s scalp, and short electromagnetic pulses are delivered to specific brain areas through the coil.

Although these pulses only cause an almost imperceptible “knocking or tapping” sensation for the patient undergoing the procedure, they reach into the brain, triggering electric currents that stimulate neurons.

Full story at Medical News Today

Failed arthritis drug may prevent opioid addiction

A drug already proven safe for use in people may prevent opioid tolerance and physical dependence when used in combination with opioid-based pain medications, according to a new study in mice.

Researchers have discovered that a compound previously tested to treat osteoarthritis pain appears to block neuropathic pain and decrease signs of opioid dependence.

When drug manufacturer Eli Lilly and Co. conducted human trials of the drug to treat osteoarthritis pain, they found that the drug lacked efficacy. Researchers had not, however, tested the drug’s use in treating other kinds of pain and lessening opioid dependence.

Full story at Futurity

Physical therapy helps recover arm function in chronic CVA

Physical therapy promotes the recovery of arm function and neuroplasticity in all chronic stroke patients, according to a study published online April 25 in the Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice.

Raquel Carvalho, P.T., from the University of Minho in Braga, Portugal, and colleagues assessed the effect of physical therapy based on problem-solving in recovering arm function in three chronic stroke patients. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (during motor imagery and performance), the action research arm test, the motor assessment scale, and the Fugl-Meyer assessment scale were used to evaluate neuroplasticity and function.

The researchers found that all patients recovered more than 20 percent after the intervention. At baseline, stroke patients had increased areas similar to healthy subjects during motor execution but not during imagination. After the intervention, all patients increased activity in the contralateral precentral area.

Full story at Medical Xpress

Dr. James Andrews, on preventing youth sports injuries: Take time off, don’t specialize

One of the nation’s foremost sports orthopedic surgeons said Wednesday night in Orlando that the best medicine to help prevent youth sports injuries is to avoid playing year-round and not to specialize in one sport.

And don’t approach a child’s athletic pursuits like he is a miniature version of Tom Brady or LeBron James.

“Don’t treat 6- and 7-year-old kids like they’re professional athletes,” Dr. James Andrews told an audience of about 100 at Florida Hospital Orlando. “They’re not ready for that level of high-intensity training.”

Andrews, 73, has operated on many top professional athletes and is the team doctor for several franchises, including the Tampa Bay Rays. He was in Central Florida as part of the hospital’s Distinguished Lecture Series and in support of his book, “Any Given Monday,” about how to avoid injuries in youth athletes.

Full story at the Orlando Sentinel

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movement

For athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action.

A team of researchers led by UW-Madison mechanical engineering professor Darryl Thelen and graduate student Jack Martin has devised a new approach for noninvasively measuring tendon tension while a person is engaging in activities like walking or running.

This advance could provide new insights into the motor control and mechanics of human movement. It also could apply to fields ranging from orthopedics, rehabilitation, ergonomics and sports. The researchers described their approach in a paper published today (April 23, 2018) in the journal Nature Communications.

Full story at Science Daily