Tag: physical therapy

Patients with newly diagnosed musculoskeletal pain are prescribed opioids more often than recommended

During their first physician visit, patients experiencing newly diagnosed chronic musculoskeletal pain are prescribed opioids more often than physical therapy, counseling, and other nonpharmacologic approaches, according to a new study published in the Journal of Pain. The use of opioids over other approaches stands in contrast with clinical recommendations for the use of nonopioid pain approaches and nonpharmacologic approaches. The study included authors from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH), part of the National Institutes of Health; the University of Montreal; and McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada.

“Particularly when the patient is experiencing pain that may become chronic, that first clinical encounter can set the course for patient care moving forward,” said Helene Langevin, M.D., director of NCCIH. “This study was designed to assess the ways in which real-world practice compares and contrasts with practice guidelines for these initial patient encounters.”

Full article at National Institute of Health

Small-Scale Study Finds Large-Scale Debt Among Recent DPT Grads

The message
It’s a limited study—based on a small number of respondents who are early-career APTA members in Florida—but the conclusions might sound familiar to recent graduates of DPT programs: The average amount of educational debt owed by entry-level PTs is equal to almost two years’ average salary, a 197% debt-to-income ratio. That’s more than the average debt-to-income ratio for newly minted family medicine physicians and veterinarians, according to the study’s author, and a burden that may affect a PT’s choice of practice setting.

The study
The analysis was developed from surveys administered to members of the Florida Physical Therapy Association’s Early Professional Special Interest Group (SIG) in 2016, all of whom were entry-level professionals (0-5 years after graduation) and practicing as PTs in Florida. The final results were based on responses from 86 individuals (out of approximately 350 PT SIG members) who answered questions related to income, amount of debt held, and clinical practice choices. The study asserts that the sample reflects “all major practice settings.” The study was authored by APTA member Steven Ambler, PT, DPT, MPH, PhD.

Full article at APTA

11 Ways Physical Therapists Help Slow the Progression of Parkinson’s Disease

It is well-known that exercise of any kind is good for each person’s health, both body and mind. But did you know that it is even more important for those living with Parkinson’s disease? Physical therapy is key to slowing down the disease. And it helps those affected to stay as independent as possible.

Improving mobility, strength, and balance

Staying mobile and self-sufficient is top of mind for people living with Parkinson’s disease. Stiffness is also a known problem with the disease. This rigidity can cause poor posture and pain that leads to other functional problems. A physical therapist can help with these problems. PTs guide people with Parkinson’s through moves and stretches to increase mobility, strength, and balance.

Full story at Choose PT

New study aims to improve walking in children with cerebral palsy

Noelle Moreau, Ph.D., PT, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Allied Health Professions, and Kristie Bjornson, PT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, are the co-principal investigators of a $2.7 million grant to study an innovative training method to improve walking in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The five-year grant was awarded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health.

The researchers, at LSU Health New Orleans and Seattle Children’s Research Institute, will compare short bursts of vigorous intensity locomotor treadmill training to traditional locomotor treadmill training. Children with CP are at greater risk for inactivity and functional decline with age. Children’s physical activity patterns are very different from adult patterns, yet the current locomotor treadmill training protocols designed to improve walking in children with CP simulate adult protocols.

Full story at News-Medical

10 exercises for a pinched nerve in the neck

A pinched nerve is a nerve that has become irritated or compressed. The nerve is not necessarily pinched, but people use this term to refer to a range of symptoms. A pinched nerve can occur at various sites in the body, including the neck. When it affects the neck, doctors call it cervical radiculopathy.

A person with a pinched nerve in the neck may experience tingling, numbness, or weakness in their neck, shoulders, hands, or arms. Pinched nerves often appear with age or due to arthritis or wear and tear on the spine.

Many people with pinched nerves are reluctant to exercise because of pain and tingling. However, staying still can actually make the pain worse because it can cause tension and wasting in nearby muscles.

Full story at Medical News Today

Magnetic nano-sized disks could restore function for Lou Gehrig’s disease patients

For decades the renowned English physicist Stephen Hawking lived with a motor neuron disease until his death last year. People who suffer from this condition lose functionality of brain cells that control essential muscle activity, such as speaking, walking, breathing and swallowing.

To help individuals afflicted by MNDs, UTSA has embarked on revolutionary research that uses magnetic nano-sized disks and magnetic fields to individually modulate functionality to crucial neurons. This research could open the door to reversal of degenerative conditions like Hawking’s to restore the quality of life for about 1 million adults across the globe.

Full story at Medical-News

Standard methods not adequate to detect prosthetic joint infections in rheumatic disease patients

Standard diagnostic methods are not adequate to identify prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) in patients with rheumatic diseases, according to findings from a new study by researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City. The study was presented at the American College of Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Professionals annual meeting in Atlanta on November 12.

Lead study author Susan M. Goodman, MD, a rheumatologist at HSS, said that while patients with rheumatic diseases are more prone to developing PJIs, it is also harder to make a PJI diagnosis in this population because many of the typical inflammation features of PJIs are similar to those seen in inflammatory arthritis flares. “If a patient with osteoarthritis comes in with a swollen and inflamed prosthetic joint, it is an infection until proven otherwise, but for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, it can be very hard to sort out whether this is part of an overall flare of disease or if it is a true infection,” she said. “None of the available tests are that helpful.”

Full story at News-Medical

How the brain regulates variability in motor functions

Anyone who has ever tried to serve a tennis ball or flip a pancake or even play a video game knows, it is hard to perform the same motion over and over again. But don’t beat yourself up—errors resulting from variability in motor function is a feature, not a bug, of our nervous system and play a critical role in learning, research suggests.

Variability in a tennis serve, for example, allows a player to see the effects of changing the toss of the ball, the swing of the racket, or the angle of the serve—all of which may lead to a better performance. But what if you’re serving ace after ace after ace? Variability in this case would not be very helpful.

If variability is good for learning but bad when you want to repeat a successful action, the brain should be able to regulate variability based on recent performance. But how?

Full story at Medical Xpress

Study Finds Racial Variation in Post-Operative Care Following Knee Replacement Surgery

A large study analyzing 107,000 knee replacement surgeries found that African Americans were significantly more likely than white patients to be discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility rather than home care after the procedure. Researchers also found that African American patients under 65 were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 90 days of a knee replacement.

The regional database analysis study was published in JAMA Network Open, an open access journal of the American Medical Association, on October 30. It was a collaborative effort among researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City (Michael L. Parks, MD), the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Jasvinder Singh, MBBS, MPH), the University of Pennsylvania (Yong Chen, PhD) and Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital (Said A. Ibrahim, MD, MPH). The study included patients who had elective knee replacement surgery in the state of Pennsylvania between 2012 and 2015.

Full story at Hospital for Special Surgery

Smartphone study shows pain more likely on humid, windy days

People with long-term health conditions are 20 percent more likely to suffer from pain on days that are humid and windy with low atmospheric pressure according to new research from University of Manchester scientists.

The study, funded by Versus Arthritis, was based on the experience of people with conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, migraine and neuropathic pain from across the UK.

According to the research, the most important factor associated with worsening pain is high relative humidity.

The study, called “Cloudy with a Chance of Pain,” ran throughout 2016 and recruited over 13,000 people from all 124 postcode areas of the UK, from Orkney to the Isles of Scilly.

Full story at Medical Xpress