Study Finds Racial Variation in Post-Operative Care Following Knee Replacement Surgery

A large study analyzing 107,000 knee replacement surgeries found that African Americans were significantly more likely than white patients to be discharged to an inpatient rehabilitation or skilled nursing facility rather than home care after the procedure. Researchers also found that African American patients under 65 were more likely to be readmitted to the hospital within 90 days of a knee replacement.

The regional database analysis study was published in JAMA Network Open, an open access journal of the American Medical Association, on October 30. It was a collaborative effort among researchers from Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York City (Michael L. Parks, MD), the University of Alabama at Birmingham (Jasvinder Singh, MBBS, MPH), the University of Pennsylvania (Yong Chen, PhD) and Weill Cornell Medicine/New York Presbyterian Hospital (Said A. Ibrahim, MD, MPH). The study included patients who had elective knee replacement surgery in the state of Pennsylvania between 2012 and 2015.

Full story at Hospital for Special Surgery

Smartphone study shows pain more likely on humid, windy days

People with long-term health conditions are 20 percent more likely to suffer from pain on days that are humid and windy with low atmospheric pressure according to new research from University of Manchester scientists.

The study, funded by Versus Arthritis, was based on the experience of people with conditions such as arthritis, fibromyalgia, migraine and neuropathic pain from across the UK.

According to the research, the most important factor associated with worsening pain is high relative humidity.

The study, called “Cloudy with a Chance of Pain,” ran throughout 2016 and recruited over 13,000 people from all 124 postcode areas of the UK, from Orkney to the Isles of Scilly.

Full story at Medical Xpress

National Athletic Trainers’ Association Releases Official Statement of Recommendations to Reduce the Risk of Injury Related to Sport Specialization for Adolescent and Young Athletes

DALLAS, TX – In anticipation of National Youth Sports Specialization Awareness Week (third full week in October) the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) released an official statement with health-focused recommendations to reduce the risk of injury due to youth sports specialization, which is often defined as year-round participation in a single sport, usually at the exclusion of other sports.

The statement was endorsed by Professional Football Athletic Trainers Society (PFATS), Professional Hockey Athletic Trainers Society (PHATS), Professional Soccer Athletic Trainers Society (PSATS), National Basketball Athletic Trainers’ Association (NBATA), Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS), and the NATA Intercollegiate Council for Sports Medicine (ICSM).

Full story at Newswise

5 Ways to Get Ready for Falls Prevention Awareness Day

An estimated 1 in 4 adults 65 and older experiences a fall each year, and according to a recent study, falls-related deaths among adults 75 and older are on the rise, all of which makes falls prevention more relevant than ever.

With Falls Prevention Awareness Day coming September 23, now is a great time to check out a few falls-related resources from APTA and its components. Here are a few ways to make the next few days a little more fall-focused.

1. Check out the tests and measures at PTNow.
In addition to being your source for clinical summaries, clinical practice guidelines, and research, APTA’s evidence-based practice resource also includes a host of tests and measures—including many related to balance. Members can download information on the 360-degree turn stand, the balance error scoring system, the elderly mobility scale, and the falls risk assessment tool, to name a few. Some of the resources even come with accompanying videos. And don’t forget other falls-related resources at PTNow, such as this clinical summary on fall risk in community-dwelling elders.

Full story at APTA

How To Teach Future Doctors About Pain In The Midst Of The Opioid Crisis

The next generation of doctors will start their careers at a time when physicians are feeling pressure to limit prescriptions for opioid painkillers.

Yet every day, they’ll face patients who are hurting from injuries, surgical procedures or disease. Around 20% of adults in the U.S. live with chronic pain.

That’s why some medical students felt a little apprehensive as they gathered recently for a mandatory, four-day course at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore — home to one of the top medical schools in the country.

The subject of the course? Pain.

Full story at NPR

How Your Well Intentioned Exercises Can Go Wrong If You’re Not Careful

Exercise prescription is at the heart of every rehab professional’s arsenal.  Whether you are prescribing a simple one such as a straight leg raise or something much more complex involving coordination of proprioception and plyometrics, you are intending to help your patients.  There’s a key component that is often missed during rehab however, and when it is, it can limit your effectiveness.  It may even drive your patients to report increased pain with treatment and in the worst cases, it prevents your patient from achieving their goals.

I don’t believe this is intentionally missed in rehab, but it’s something you will rarely see in research and a component rarely focused on in school.  Is your intervention aimed at the wrong impairment?

Let’s start with this example that’s easier to see and then we’ll move onto one that may be a bit less obvious.

Full story at Physiospot

Regular physical activity associated with decreased risk of postoperative delirium

After having surgery, many older adults develop delirium, the medical term for sudden and severe confusion. In fact, between 10 and 67 percent of older adults experience delirium after surgery for non-heart-related issues, while 5 to 61 percent experience delirium after orthopedic surgery (surgery dealing with the bones and muscles).

Delirium can lead to problems with thinking and decision-making. It can also make it difficult to be mobile and perform daily functions and can increase the risk for illness and death. Because adults over age 65 undergo more than 18 million surgeries each year, delirium can have a huge impact personally, as well as for families and our communities.

Healthcare providers can use several tools to reduce the chances older adults will develop delirium. Providers can meet with a geriatrician before surgery, review prescribed medications, and make sure glasses and hearing aids are made available after surgery (since difficulty seeing or hearing can contribute to confusion). However, preventing delirium prior to surgery may be the best way to help older adults avoid it.

Full story at News Medical

Common Products Linked To Traumatic Brain Injuries In Children Exposed

A person may sustain a traumatic brain injury due to a blow or jolt to the head. Vehicular accidents, sports, assaults and falls are the most common causes of sudden damage to the brain.

However, common consumer products found at home can also cause such injury, particularly in young people. A new study found that 72 percent of reported injuries among children and teens in the U.S. were linked to materials found indoors.

Researchers analyzed nearly 4.1 million non-fatal traumatic brain injuries in children and adolescents, aged up to 19 years, recorded between 2010 and 2013. Data came from 66 hospitals across the country.

The study, published in the journal Brain Injury, shows that American football, beds and floors caused the highest number of injuries in young people.

Full story at Medical News Today

Causes and treatments for pain in the arch of the foot

The arch of the foot is an area along the bottom of the foot between the ball and the heel. Pain in the arch of the foot is a common problem, especially among athletes.

The arch is made up of three separate arches that form a triangle. Each arch is made up of bones, ligaments, and tendons.

There are many potential causes of pain in the arch of the foot. Keep reading for more information on these causes, as well as the possible treatments.

Full story at Medical News Today

#Fail? Study Says Physical Therapy’s Reach on Social Media Comes up Short

When it comes to using social media to promote the profession, physical therapy may be missing out: that’s the conclusion of a recent study that analyzed physical therapy-related tweets and found that, for the most part, Twitter discussions about the profession are occurring in an “echo chamber”—if they even rise to the level of a discussion in the first place.

The study, published in APTA’s journal PTJ (Physical Therapy), looked at a random sample of 1,000 tweets from a collection of 30,000 tweets gathered over a 12-week period. Researchers sorted out each message according to its author, intended audience, tone, and theme, and—when it occurred—the “pattern” of the twitter conversation, which includes shares as well as actual online exchanges. The collection was based on 9 search terms: physical therapy, physiotherapy, physical therapist, physiotherapist, #physicaltherapy, #physiotherapy, #physical therapist, #physiotherapist, and #physio. Hashtags associated with “known physical therapy campaigns,” such as APTA’s #ChoosePT, were not included in the searches.

Full story at APTA