Study: Mothers Who Exercise During Pregnancy Give Their Infants a Motor Skills Boost

The message
Infants of mothers who engaged in aerobic exercise during pregnancy tend to show better motor development at 1 month compared with infants of nonexercising mothers, according to authors of a new study. The researchers believe that aerobic exercise during pregnancy could be a hedge against childhood overweight and obesity.

The study
Researchers analyzed data from 60 healthy mothers (ages 18 to 35, with an average age of 30) and their infants. During their pregnancies, 33 women participated in 45-50 minutes of supervised aerobic exercise, 3 days a week. The remaining 27 women in the control group were asked to engage in a 50-minute supervised stretching and breathing program 3 days a week, but were otherwise advised to continue with “normal” activities. The infants of both groups were then evaluated for motor skills development at 1 month using the Peabody Developmental Motor Scales, second edition (PDMS-2), a tool that tests reflexes, locomotion, and a child’s ability to remain stationary. The measure also provides a composite score, known as the Gross Motor Quotient (GMQ).

Full study at APTA

New guideline on pelvic girdle pain during pregnancy

Pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is a common condition that causes pain and physical impairment, most frequently during the antepartum (before delivery) period. A new guideline for evidence-based physical therapy practice for PGP during pregnancy appears in the Journal of Women’s Health Physical Therapy, official journal of the Section on Women’s Health (SOWH) of the American Physical Therapy Association.

Created by the authors for the SOWH and Orthopedic Section of the APTA, the new document presents a clinical practice guideline for physical therapy management for PGP in the antepartum population. The lead author is Susan C. Clinton, PT, DScPT, COMT, OCS, WCS, FAAOMPT, of Embody Physiotherapy & Wellness, LLC, Sewickley, Pa.

Full story on the new guidelines for PGP at Medical Xpress