Study: Primary Prevention Key to Decreasing Disparity in Black-White Stroke Mortality Rate

Reducing the stark disparity in stroke mortality between black and white Americans requires a focus on risk prevention in primary care and public health, say authors of a new study. But, they add, those efforts need to “go further upstream” by examining the reasons for the higher prevalence of stroke risk factors among black Americans, including consideration of what authors call “nontraditional risk factors.”

While overall stroke mortality and risk factors such as hypertension have declined over the years for both groups, black Americans at age 45 are more than 3 times as likely as their white peers to die of the disease. Although this difference has existed for decades, it wasn’t clear, based on evidence, where and how to target interventions accordingly.

The big question, according to authors, has to do with whether black Americans are having more strokes than white Americans, or whether strokes are more often fatal for black Americans. The answer could help health care providers, including physical therapists, understand the best way to approach this public health issue.

Full story of disparity in black-white stroke mortality rate at APTA