Tag: PT CEUs

Humana Adopts PTA Coding System, Anticipates Payment Differential Beginning in 2022

Commercial health insurance giant Humana has announced that it’s falling in line with rules from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services designed to establish an 85% payment differential for therapy services delivered “in whole or in part” by a PTA or occupational therapy assistant. Consistent with CMS, Humana is requiring use of code modifiers in 2020, with no changes to payment until 2022.

The new system, which establishes a code modifier (“CQ” for PTAs and “CO” for OTAs) began on January 1 for Medicare Part B payments. The new approach was triggered by federal law that mandated the creation of a way to denote the volume of physical therapy and occupational therapy services delivered by PTAs or OTAs, and then create a payment differential for those services. In its announcement, Humana states that its policy will mirror the CMS rule, “as applicable in the Federal Register and relevant CMS guidance.” Like CMS, Humana also is requiring the modifier on all applicable claims submitted for services delivered beginning January 1, 2020.

Full article at APTA

A key-hole procedure to treat foot and ankle disorder decreases pain, improves patient outcomes

A minimally invasive procedure to treat a common foot and ankle disorder can reduce pain, recovery time, and postsurgery complications while improving functional outcomes, according to a report published in the journal Foot and Ankle Surgery.

The procedure treats insertional Achilles tendinopathy, a common and chronic orthopedic disorder in which patients experience pain at the Achilles tendon. The chronic degenerative condition can be particularly painful for athletes who perform push-off activities, such as basketball and soccer players.

The key-hole procedure, known as percutaneous Zadek osteotomy (ZO), can significantly decrease pain and provide a patient with relief in as little as six weeks after this technique compared to 23 weeks for recovery after the traditional open surgery.

Full article at News-Medical.net

Separate Studies, Similar Conclusions: Bundling for Knee, Hip Replacement Seems to be Working

Has all the bundling been worth it? Two new studies of bundled care models used by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) conclude that, at least for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR), the answer is yes. Taken as a whole, the studies make the case that while the savings achieved through some bundled care models may not be dramatic, they do exist — and aren’t associated with a drop in quality.

The studies, published in Health Affairs, take different approaches to answering questions about the effectiveness of bundling programs mostly associated with CMS’ voluntary Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative: one was a systematic review that analyzed existing research on the programs, while the other focused on data from hospitals that did and did not participate in BCPI over a three-year period. Their conclusions, however, had much in common.

Full article at APTA

New APTA-Supported CPG Looks at Best Ways to Improve Walking Speed, Distance for Individuals After Stroke, Brain Injury, and Incomplete SCI

The message
A new clinical practice guideline (CPG) supported by APTA and developed by the APTA Academy of Neurologic Physical Therapy concludes that when it comes to working with individuals who experienced an acute-onset central nervous system (CNS) injury 6 months ago or more, aerobic walking training and virtual reality (VR) treadmill training are the interventions most strongly tied to improvements in walking distance and speed. Other interventions such as strength training, circuit training, and cycling training also may be considered, authors write, but providers should avoid robotic-assisted walking training, body-weight supported treadmill training, and sitting/standing balance that doesn’t employ augmented visual inputs.

The study
The final recommendations in the CPG are the result of an extensive process that began with a scan of nearly 4,000 research abstracts and subsequent full-text review of 234 articles, further narrowed to 111 randomized controlled trials (RCTs), all focused on interventions related to CNS injuries, with outcome data that included measures of walking distance and speed. CPG panelists evaluated the data and developed recommendations, which were informed by data on patient preferences and submitted for expert and stakeholder review.

Full article at APTA

Time to Act: Surprise Coding Complication Ignores Realities of PT Practice and Must be Changed

The US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) unveiled an unwelcome New Year’s Day surprise for outpatient therapy providers, including private practitioners and facility-based settings, when it announced it will no longer allow two frequently used therapy billing codes to be used in combination with evaluation codes. It’s a decision that flies in the face of standard PT practice and effective patient care—and CMS and the National Correct Coding Initiative (NCCI) contractor need to hear that perspective loud and clear, from as many stakeholders as possible as soon as possible.

At issue are current procedural terminology (CPT) codes 97530 (therapeutic activities) and 97150 (therapeutic procedures, group, 2 or more individuals) which, until January 1, were allowed to be billed on the same day as physical therapy or occupational therapy evaluation. Under new CMS NCCI edits, however, that’s no longer allowed. And in a further complication, the latest NCCI edits also require use of the 59 modifier—the modifier that’s used to indicate that a code represents a service that is separate and distinct from another service to which it is paired—whenever code 97140 (manual therapy) is billed with an evaluation.

Full article at APTA