Results support physical therapy or arthroscopic partial meniscectomy in degenerative knees

Arthroscopic partial meniscectomy was as effective as physical therapy in patients with degenerative knees and a confirmed meniscal tear that was non-obstructive, according to results of a multicenter study presented at the EFORT Annual Congress.

At the meeting, Victor A. van de Graaf, MD, Rudolf W. Poolman, MD, PhD, and colleagues at OLVG Ziekenhuis in Amsterdam received the EFORT Gold Orthopedics Free Paper Award, which designated their paper as the best one in the orthopedic category at the congress.

Participants in the study, which was conducted at six hospitals in the Netherlands, were consented and then randomized 1:1 to either arthroscopic partial meniscectomy (APM) or physical therapy (PT). They were also stratified by age into a group of patients aged 45 to 57 years and a group aged 58 to 70 years.

The mean improvement in the IKDC score from baseline to the 24-month follow-up was the primary outcome, results of which were more favorable for the APM group.

Full story at Healio

Collaborative Stop the Cap Efforts from APTA, AOTA, ASHA Receive National Award

APTA has earned another national award—this time for collaborative efforts to push for an end to the Medicare outpatient therapy cap.

The American Society of Association Executives (ASAE) announced that APTA, the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), and the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) were the joint winners of a 2018 Power of A Gold Award for their combined “Stop the Cap” efforts. The work of the 3 associations was instrumental in a congressional decision to permanently end the flawed cap process.

ASAE’s Power of A (the A stands for “association”) Awards, are the industry’s highest honor, recognizing the association community’s valuable contributions on local, national, and global levels. The award will be presented to APTA, AOTA, and ASHA at an ASAE awards dinner on October 3. As a Gold Award winner, the Stop the Cap program is 1 of 6 campaigns under consideration for ASAE’s Summit Award, which will be announced later this summer.

Full story at APTA

Customized resistance exercise helps female fibromyalgia patients improve health

Fibromyalgia and resistance exercise have often been considered an impossible combination. But with proper support and individually adjusted exercises, female patients achieved considerable health improvements, according to research carried out at Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden.

“If the goal for these women is to improve their strength, then they shouldn’t be afraid to exercise, but they need to exercise the right way. It has long been said that they will only experience more pain as a result of resistance exercise, that it doesn’t work. But in fact, it does,” says Anette Larsson, whose dissertation was in physical therapy and who is an active physical therapist.

As part of her dissertation, she studied 130 women aged between 20-65 years with fibromyalgia, a disease in which nine of ten cases are women. It is characterized by widespread muscle pain and increased pain sensitivity, often combined with fatigue, reduced physical capacity and limitation of activities in daily life.

Full story at news-medical.net

10 Common Misconceptions About Pelvic Physical Therapy | Pelvic Guru

Have you ever heard of pelvic physical therapy before? Many have not, but this specialty can be a crucial part of someone’s complete medical care – for women, men, and even children. As one my patients recently said,  “I had no idea this sort of thing exists, but I’m sure glad I found it because it has been THE missing treatment I have needed for years!”.

I had never heard of pelvic physical therapy prior to beginning my doctoral program at Duke University. I remember very clearly when I first learned that some physical therapists did “that.” One of my fellow students had completed a small half-day observation at a local clinic, and excitedly told us all about his day watching the “Pelvic PTs.” We were blown away. We had always assumed physical therapists treated back pain, helped patients after surgery, worked with people who had strokes…but pelvic pain? Urinary incontinence? Sexual dysfunction? This was shocking and new.

Full story at Austin Surgical Institute

Possible new treatment for spinal cord injuries identified in animal studies

An experimental drug has shown promise as a potential therapy for spinal cord injuries in animal studies.

The compound, 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol, works in a similar way as a drug previously developed at Purdue, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), which has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat multiple sclerosis.

Dr. Riyi Shi, professor in the Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Weldon School of Biomedical Engineering, who was involved in the development of both drugs, compared the two compounds in both cell cultures and animal models.

“For the first time, 4-aminopyridine-3-methanol is shown to restore function in chronic spinal cord injuries,” he says. “It also reduces neuropathic pain to a greater degree than 4-AP.

Full story at Medical Xpress

New lab technology could reveal treatments for muscle-wasting disease

DMD is a genetic disorder causing muscle degeneration and weakness, caused by an absence of the protein dystrophin. DMD usually affects only boys, with around 100 being born with the condition in the UK each year. There are about 2,500 males known to be living with the condition in the UK at any one time.

There are currently no effective treatments for the disease, and patients often succumb to cardiomyopathy, a weakness of the heart muscle which can be fatal. Significant advances have been made in treating DMD in animal models, but there has not yet been success in translating this into medicines for DMD patients.

The new approach, led by Dr Yung-Yao Lin from Queen Mary’s Blizard Institute and supported by Professor Andy Tinker from Queen Mary’s William Harvey Research Institute, uses the latest advances in gene editing and stem cell technology to develop a model of human cells with DMD which mimic what happens in a patient’s muscles.

Full story at Queen Mary University of London

Pitcher injuries increase as pitch count rises

More than half of high school baseball pitchers report experiencing pain in their throwing arms during the season. To better understand the cause of these injuries, researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center conducted a new study to determine when and why overuse injuries are occurring.

“We found that the number of injuries peaked early — only about four weeks in — and then slowly declined until the end of the season,” said James Onate, associate professor of health and rehabilitation sciences at the Jameson Crane Sports Medicine Institute. “We see a lot of kids who didn’t prepare in the off-season and, when their workload goes through the roof, they’re not prepared for the demand of throwing.”

To accurately assess the timing and severity of their pain, 97 high school pitchers were asked to submit a weekly questionnaire via text message.

Full story at Science Daily

Study links sleep loss with nighttime snacking, junk food cravings, obesity, diabetes

Nighttime snacking and junk food cravings may contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors and represent a potential link between poor sleep and obesity, according to a study by University of Arizona Health Sciences sleep researchers.

Nighttime snacking and junk food cravings may contribute to unhealthy eating behaviors and represent a potential link between poor sleep and obesity, according to a study by University of Arizona Health Sciences sleep researchers.

The study was conducted via a nationwide, phone-based survey of 3,105 adults from 23 U.S. metropolitan areas. Participants were asked if they regularly consumed a nighttime snack and whether lack of sleep led them to crave junk food. They also were asked about their sleep quality and existing health problems.

About 60 percent of participants reported regular nighttime snacking and two-thirds reported that lack of sleep led them to crave more junk food.

Full story at Medical Xpress

What’s the truth about chiropractors?

Chiropractors attend graduate-level health colleges to treat disorders of the bones, nerves, muscles, and ligaments. They graduate as doctors of chiropractic degrees, but they are not medical doctors.

While chiropractors are widely known for treating back and neck pain, they also treat bone and soft tissue conditions.

In this article, we explore myths and truths of chiropractic care. We also describe the training that chiropractors undergo, how safe these treatments may be, and the research behind the practice.

Full story at Medical News Today

Deltoid pain: Types and treatment

The deltoid is a large muscle responsible for lifting the arm and giving the shoulder its range of motion.

It is located in the uppermost part of the arm, at the shoulder. Tendons attach the deltoid to the collarbone, shoulder blade, and upper arm.

Like many other muscles, the deltoid can be sore for a variety of reasons, including overuse and tendon injuries.

In this article, we explore the causes of deltoid pain. We also describe home remedies and treatments that can provide relief.

Full story at Medical News Today