Tag: pta

Teen Can Return to School After Undergoing Free Surgery to Correct Her Extreme Bow-Leggedness

These incredible before and after photos show the transformation of a teenager who was given free surgery to correct her extremely bowed legs.

14-year-old Valerie—who surgeons declined to fully name—developed bowed legs at the age of four and had such low self-confidence, she convinced her parents to pull her out of school.

She joined her uncle’s tailoring shop as an apprentice and worked hard, despite the fact that her harshly-angled legs arched outwards from her hips, making it difficult for her to walk.

The talented seamstress was busy sewing when a customer told her that a hospital boat operated by the charity Mercy Ships had docked near her West African home in Cotonou, Benin.

Full story at Good News Network

IncludeHealth and Cincinnati Children’s join hands to commercialize movement correction technology

IncludeHealth, an internationally recognized provider of inclusive digital health and performance technologies, and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center (Cincinnati Children’s), a top-ranked pediatric medical center and research institution, announced today an exclusive licensing agreement to allow IncludeHealth to commercialize a research based digital health technology originally developed at Cincinnati Children’s. The technology is called aNMT (pronounced “animate” and an abbreviation of Augmented Neuromuscular Training), and it offers camera-based, real-time movement analysis coupled with corrective feedback to optimize biomechanics (physical movements) for injury prevention and performance enhancement. The aNMT technology will integrate with IncludeHealth’s cloud platform and data analytics solution to provide clinically validated treatment paths for physical therapy patients, including children and adults recovering from musculoskeletal diseases, disorders or injuries; seniors with mobility issues or other musculoskeletal pain; and athletes of all ages and physical ability.

An estimated 126.6 million Americans (one in two adults) are affected by a musculoskeletal condition. Comparable to the total percentage of Americans living with a chronic lung or heart condition, musculoskeletal care costs an estimated $213 billion in annual treatment, care and lost wages, according to the United States Bone and Joint Initiative (USBJI).

Full story at News-Medical

Telemedicine may be as effective as in-person visit for people with many neurologic disorders

For people with many neurologic disorders, seeing the neurologist by video may be as effective as an in-person visit, according to a review of the evidence conducted by the American Academy of Neurology (AAN). The evidence review examined all available studies on use of telemedicine for several neurologic conditions – stroke being one of the conditions that is well-validated and highly utilizes telemedicine – and is published in the December 4, 2019, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the AAN. The results indicate that a diagnosis from a neurologist by video for certain neurologic conditions is likely to be as accurate as an in-person visit.

Telemedicine is the use of video conferencing or other technology for doctor visits from another location. The patient could be at home or at a local doctor’s office.

Full story at News-Medical

One in three U.S. high schools have no athletic trainers

One in every three high schools in the U.S. has no access to an athletic trainer, according to a large study.

Even among the schools with some access, in roughly half the trainer is only part-time, the researchers report in the Journal of Athletic Training.

“Every athlete who participates in sport at the high school level deserves the best when it comes to emergency best practices and athletic injuries,” said lead author Robert Huggins of the University of Connecticut, in Storrs.

Athletic trainers provide emergency and non-emergency care for athletes and are the main healthcare professionals trained in injury prevention for physical activity. At the high school level, they coordinate care and follow-up, conduct rehabilitation and return players to the game. They help with concussions, orthopedic injuries, eating disorders, heat illnesses, heart issues, weight management, diabetic episodes and substance abuse concerns.

Full story at Reuters

New study aims to improve walking in children with cerebral palsy

Noelle Moreau, Ph.D., PT, Associate Professor of Physical Therapy at LSU Health New Orleans School of Allied Health Professions, and Kristie Bjornson, PT, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, are the co-principal investigators of a $2.7 million grant to study an innovative training method to improve walking in children with cerebral palsy (CP). The five-year grant was awarded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development of the National Institutes of Health.

The researchers, at LSU Health New Orleans and Seattle Children’s Research Institute, will compare short bursts of vigorous intensity locomotor treadmill training to traditional locomotor treadmill training. Children with CP are at greater risk for inactivity and functional decline with age. Children’s physical activity patterns are very different from adult patterns, yet the current locomotor treadmill training protocols designed to improve walking in children with CP simulate adult protocols.

Full story at News-Medical

The New Postacute Care Payment Systems: 5 Tips to Help You Find Your Way

There’s no doubt about it: the new payment system that the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) put in place in October for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), and the system that will start up for home health agencies (HHAs) on January 1, 2020, represent major changes by Medicare. And like most major changes, the new approaches have sparked myths, misunderstandings, and inaccurate interpretations—sometimes at the expense of physical therapists (PTs) and physical therapist assistants (PTAs) who work in the SNF and HHA settings and their patients.

Discussions on what would become the new systems—the SNF payment model is called the Patient-Driven Payment Model (PDPM) and the HHA approach is known as the Patient-Driven Groupings Model (PDGM)—began 3 years ago, and APTA immediately began a dialogue with CMS that continues to this day. Those interactions, fueled by strong grassroots efforts among APTA members and other stakeholders, have helped to shape final rules that are far from perfect but significantly less problematic than many of the early proposals from CMS.

Full story at APTA

Facial injuries related to cell phones have risen steeply

According to the study, which was published yesterday in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery, the incidence of these head injuries spiked around the year 2007, when the first iPhone was introduced.

Most of the injuries occurred among people aged between 13 and 29 years and were due to being distracted by cell phones whilst driving, walking, and texting.

The research was led by a facial plastic surgeon Boris Paskhover at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, who says his experience treating patients with cell phone injuries prompted him to investigate the problem.

Full story at News-Medical

10 exercises for a pinched nerve in the neck

A pinched nerve is a nerve that has become irritated or compressed. The nerve is not necessarily pinched, but people use this term to refer to a range of symptoms. A pinched nerve can occur at various sites in the body, including the neck. When it affects the neck, doctors call it cervical radiculopathy.

A person with a pinched nerve in the neck may experience tingling, numbness, or weakness in their neck, shoulders, hands, or arms. Pinched nerves often appear with age or due to arthritis or wear and tear on the spine.

Many people with pinched nerves are reluctant to exercise because of pain and tingling. However, staying still can actually make the pain worse because it can cause tension and wasting in nearby muscles.

Full story at Medical News Today

Beyond Opioids: The Future of Pain Management

March 14, 2018 — Cindi Scheib wanted to die.

A three-day weekend spent jumping and dancing on Labor Day 2014 had left her with a neck injury – specifically the cervical spine – that was possibly an exacerbation of an unrecognized mountain biking injury earlier that year. To make matters worse, her doctor performed the surgery to fix the injury on the wrong part of her spine.

Now 54, Scheib has lived with constant neck pain and other unusual sensations throughout her body ever since. These sensations, including electrical shocks down her spine, buzzing, vibrating, burning sensations, ringing in her ears and sensitivity to normal noises, had gotten so bad, she said, that “I wanted to go to bed and not wake up tomorrow. This life was so bad, so horrible, that I couldn’t imagine how I was going to live the rest of whatever life I had,” says the Harrisburg, PA, nurse.

Full story at WedMD

Magnetic nano-sized disks could restore function for Lou Gehrig’s disease patients

For decades the renowned English physicist Stephen Hawking lived with a motor neuron disease until his death last year. People who suffer from this condition lose functionality of brain cells that control essential muscle activity, such as speaking, walking, breathing and swallowing.

To help individuals afflicted by MNDs, UTSA has embarked on revolutionary research that uses magnetic nano-sized disks and magnetic fields to individually modulate functionality to crucial neurons. This research could open the door to reversal of degenerative conditions like Hawking’s to restore the quality of life for about 1 million adults across the globe.

Full story at Medical-News