Ayurvedic treatment for rheumatoid arthritis: What to know

Ayurveda is an traditional Indian practice involving a natural, holistic approach to treating medical conditions.

Some Ayurvedic practitioners use Ayurveda to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which they call “amavata.” Ayurvedic treatment can include supplements, dietary changes, and exercise.

This article will review Ayurvedic treatment for RA, including the basic principles and whether research supports its use.

General principles

The term “Ayurveda” is a combination of two Sanskrit terms “ayu” (life) and “veda” (knowledge). Practitioners work to balance the three energy forces, or “doshas,” of life: “vata,” “pitta,” and “kapha.”

Full story at Medical News Today

What to expect from knee surgery rehabilitation

A person may have knee surgery to treat pain in the joint due to an injury, such as torn cartilage or a torn ligament. It can also treat other conditions, such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and post-traumatic arthritis.

This article will look at the different types of knee surgery, the rehabilitation timelines, and what people can do to help speed up the recovery process.

Types of knee surgery

There are various types of knee surgery. The type that a person has will depend on the particular injury to the knee joint.

Full story at Medical New Todays

How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the ankles?

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect the ankle joints in a similar way to other joints, causing stiffness, swelling, and pain.

Most often, rheumatoid arthritis or RA affects the hands and feet, but, less commonly, it can also affect the ankles.

The condition typically impacts on smaller joints first, such as the toe joints in the foot. It may then move to larger joints, such as the ankles. RA in the ankles can impede walking and cause considerable discomfort.

In this article, we take a close look at how RA affects the ankles, including the symptoms, and how people can relieve pain and swelling.

Full story at Medical News Today

How does rheumatoid arthritis affect the ankles?

Rheumatoid arthritis can affect the ankle joints in a similar way to other joints, causing stiffness, swelling, and pain.

Most often, rheumatoid arthritis or RA affects the hands and feet, but, less commonly, it can also affect the ankles.

The condition typically impacts on smaller joints first, such as the toe joints in the foot. It may then move to larger joints, such as the ankles. RA in the ankles can impede walking and cause considerable discomfort.

In this article, we take a close look at how RA affects the ankles, including the symptoms, and how people can relieve pain and swelling.

Full story at Medical News Today

Early signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a disorder where a person’s immune system attacks their joints, causing them to become inflamed. What are the early signs of this condition?

The symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) typically affect the hands, wrists, and feet. Spotting signs of RA early could lead to an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

Early and consistent management of arthritis can prevent joint damage and, ultimately, disability.

Full story at Medical News Today

Number of Americans Reporting Arthritis-Related Activity Limitations on the Rise

The overall prevalence of arthritis in the US may be about the same as it was 15 year ago, but its burden on Americans is worsening at a rapid pace—and in a particularly troubling way. According to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of Americans with arthritis who report that the condition limits their activities has jumped by 20% since 2002. It’s a trend the CDC believes can only be countered by “existing, underused, evidence-based interventions,” specifically interventions that promote physical activity, which the CDC describes as “a proven strategy for managing arthritis.”

In its report released March 7, the CDC analyzed results from 3 years of National Health Interview Surveys conducted between 2013 and 2015, focusing on respondents who reported arthritis (for the CDC, that includes osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, gout, and fibromyalgia). The sample was balanced to reflect US population demographics, which allowed CDC to make overall estimates based on the results, and compared with statistics from 2002. Among the findings:

Full story of rising numbers in arthritis-related activity limitations at APTA

Researchers add to evidence that common bacterial cause of gum disease may drive rheumatoid arthritis

Investigators at Johns Hopkins report they have new evidence that a bacterium known to cause chronic inflammatory gum infections also triggers the inflammatory “autoimmune” response characteristic of chronic, joint-destroying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The new findings have important implications for prevention and treatment of RA, say the researchers.

In a report on the work, published in the Dec. 14 edition of the journal Science Translational Medicine, the investigators say the common denominator they identified in periodontal disease (gum disease) and in many people with RA is Aggregatibacter actinomy cetemcomitans. An infection with A. actinomy cetemcomitans appears to induce the production of citrullinated proteins, which are suspected of activating the immune system and driving the cascade of events leading to RA.

Full story of gum disease and rheumatoid arthritis at Science Daily

County-by-County Analysis Finds Pockets of High Arthritis Prevalence

As if the prevalence of arthritis in more than 1 and 5 Americans isn’t challenging enough, now comes information that breaks down statistics at the county level to find that prevalence is very uneven across the US, with rates as low as 15.8% in some counties and more than 33% in others.

The new statistics are part of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report set for release on May 20. That report describes the results of a detailed study of the 2014 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a survey of 464,444 noninstitutionalized adults across the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and US territories.

Researchers analyzed the prevalence rates for respondents who answered “yes” to the question “have you ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that you have some form of arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, gout, lupus, or fibromyalgia?” and found that the overall prevalence rate for US adults is 22.7%.

Full story of high arthritis prevalence by County at APTA