12-Year Study Tracks Impact of Television Viewing Patterns on Strength

It’s no secret that large amounts of sedentary behavior, such as is associated with extensive television viewing, can have a negative effect on physical function and overall health. Now researchers in Australia have amassed 12 years’ worth of data that shows how extended viewing habits can impact knee extensor strength, and the results are about what you’d expect—with 1 exception.

Researchers drew data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity, and Lifestyle Study, a longitudinal project that began in 1999 and attempts to track its 11,000 participants over time. The most recent wave of data collection, which involves participants coming to onsite testing centers, was conducted 2011-2012. A total of 1,983 participants who had been with the program since the beginning were included in the current study, allowing researchers to follow television viewing patterns over time using group-based trajectory modeling (GBTM). Results were e-published ahead of print in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise.

Full story on study of television viewing patterns on strength at APTA