HIV: New East Bay program gives prevention pill to high-risk youths

Prevention Pill to HIV High-Risk YouthsDavid was skeptical. It sounded too good to be true. A once-a-day pill that could help healthy people avoid HIV infection?

But David also knew he was at high risk because his partner was HIV-positive.

So after careful research, the 21-year-old Oakland resident decided to join an unusual program that will give the drug known as Truvada to more than 100 East Bay youths, along with safe-sex counseling and other sexual health services.

Those overseeing the program hope it can help solve a serious problem: The number of people nationwide who are newly infected with HIV, the virus that can cause AIDS, has held steady at about 50,000 annually in recent years after dropping sharply in the late 1980s, despite health professionals’ best efforts to tackle the problem.

“There is a degree of frustration — we don’t seem to be able to reduce the level of transmission,” said George Lemp, director of the University of California Office of the President’s HIV/AIDS Research Program.

“A lot of people felt that we needed more aggressive approaches,” he said.

Full story of prevention pill to high-risk youths at Mercury News

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Teens’ diabetes management supported by family problem-solving

Teen Diabetes Supported by FamiliesA clinic-based program for adolescents with type 1 diabetes and their families helped the teens develop the healthy behaviors needed to control their blood sugar levels, researchers at the National Institutes of Health have found.

The researchers found that 12- to 15-year-olds benefited from a two-year program of three to four meetings each year with parents and a health advisor to discuss shared responsibilities, goals and strategies for solving diabetes management problems that arose.

"Adolescence can be difficult for families—even without the complex challenge of taking care of diabetes," said first author Tonja R. Nansel, Ph.D., of the Prevention Research Branch of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), the institute that conducted the study. "Our study found that meeting with a health advisor during regular diabetes clinic visits could help families put together strategies for dealing with diabetes, to better manage the changes that occur as children take on more responsibility for their day-to-day diabetes care."

Full story of teens diabetes at Medical Xpress

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