Neurocognitive Impairment Linked to Worse Outcomes After Total Joint Replacement

People with undiagnosed neurocognitive deficits are undergoing hip and knee replacements at high rates and are more likely to have poorer short-term outcomes after surgery, according to new research led by orthopedic surgeons at NYU Langone Health.

The study of patients who were screened with cognitive assessments prior to undergoing a total joint arthroplasty, or replacement, showed that those who scored worse on the tests were significantly more likely to fail to progress in rehabilitation and to require admission into the intensive care unit (ICU).

“Our data suggest that neurocognitive impairment is highly prevalent in older individuals who are set to undergo total joint replacements, and we suspect that rates may be underestimated nationwide,” says┬áJames Slover, MD, an associate professor of orthopedic surgery at NYU School of Medicine, and an attending orthopedic surgeon and clinical site chief at NYU Langone Orthopedic Hospital. “These patients required more hospital resources and progressed more slowly with physical therapy after surgery. Therefore, it is critical that strategies are developed to screen these patients and protocols are put in place to allocate more support to them before and after surgery.”

Full story at Science Newsline

Neurocognitive deficits worsen outcomes for joint replacement surgery, finds study

In the study, patients were screened with cognitive assessments prior to undergoing a total joint arthroplasty, or replacement.

The findings suggested that people with poor assessment scores were less likely to to complete rehabilitation programs successfully and often require admission into the intensive care unit (ICU).

He went on to say: “These patients required more hospital resources and progressed more slowly with physical therapy after surgery. Therefore, it is critical that strategies are developed to screen these patients and protocols are put in place to allocate more support to them before and after surgery.”

Full story at news-medical.net